80,000 Hours donations received

This is an online portal with information on donations that were announced publicly (or have been shared with permission) that were of interest to Vipul Naik. The git repository with the code for this portal, as well as all the underlying data, is available on GitHub. All payment amounts are in current United States dollars (USD). The repository of donations is being seeded with an initial collation by Issa Rice as well as continued contributions from him (see his commits and the contract work page listing all financially compensated contributions to the site) but all responsibility for errors and inaccuracies belongs to Vipul Naik. Current data is preliminary and has not been completely vetted and normalized; if sharing a link to this site or any page on this site, please include the caveat that the data is preliminary (if you want to share without including caveats, please check with Vipul Naik). We expect to have completed the first round of development by the end of December 2019. See the about page for more details. Also of interest: pageview data on analytics.vipulnaik.com, tutorial in README, request for feedback to EA Forum.

Table of contents

Basic donee information

ItemValue
Country United Kingdom
Facebook page 80000Hours
Websitehttps://80000hours.org/
Donate pagehttps://80000hours.org/support-us/donate/
Donors list pagehttps://80000hours.org/about/donors/
Transparency and financials pagehttps://80000hours.org/about/credibility/evaluations/
Donation case pagehttp://effective-altruism.com/ea/15d/why_donate_to_80000_hours/
Twitter username80000hours
Wikipedia pagehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80%2C000_Hours
Key peopleWilliam MacAskill|Benjamin Todd|Robert Wiblin
Launch date2011-11

Donee donation statistics

Cause areaCountMedianMeanMinimum10th percentile 20th percentile 30th percentile 40th percentile 50th percentile 60th percentile 70th percentile 80th percentile 90th percentile Maximum
Overall 27 25,300 289,456 0 0 159 1,692 12,934 25,300 38,308 75,818 200,000 510,000 4,795,803
Effective altruism 16 45,000 458,218 0 0 80 100 25,300 45,000 91,450 200,000 280,000 1,125,000 4,795,803
Career coaching 5 2,465 8,452 159 159 159 200 200 2,465 2,465 13,146 13,146 26,292 26,292
5 21,053 18,311 500 500 500 1,692 1,692 21,053 21,053 30,000 30,000 38,308 38,308
Career planning 1 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000

Donation amounts by donor and year for donee 80,000 Hours

Donor Total 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012
Open Philanthropy Project (filter this donee) 6,430,803.00 4,795,803.00 510,000.00 1,125,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund (filter this donee) 490,818.00 370,000.00 120,818.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative (filter this donee) 350,000.00 350,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Survival and Flourishing Fund (filter this donee) 280,000.00 280,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund (filter this donee) 91,450.00 0.00 91,450.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Patrick Brinich-Langlois (filter this donee) 70,500.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 40,000.00 30,000.00 0.00 500.00
Mark Barnes (filter this donee) 39,437.36 0.00 0.00 0.00 26,291.57 13,145.79 0.00 0.00 0.00
Haseeb Qureshi (filter this donee) 25,300.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 25,300.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Jeff Kaufman and Julia Wise (filter this donee) 21,053.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 21,053.00
Oxford Prioritisation Project (filter this donee) 12,934.00 0.00 0.00 12,934.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Saulius Šimčikas (filter this donee) 2,464.84 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,464.84 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Raymond Arnold (filter this donee) 200.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 200.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Peter Hurford (filter this donee) 180.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 80.00 0.00
Sophia Cyna (filter this donee) 159.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 159.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
EA Giving Group (filter this donee) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 7,815,299.63 5,795,803.00 722,268.00 1,137,934.00 54,415.84 53,145.79 30,100.00 80.00 21,553.00

Full list of documents in reverse chronological order (22 documents)

Title (URL linked)Publication dateAuthorPublisherAffected donorsAffected doneesDocument scopeCause areaNotes
80,000 Hours Annual Review – December 20182019-05-07Benjamin Todd 80,000 HoursOpen Philanthropy Project Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund 80,0000 Hours Donee periodic updateEffective altruism/movement growth/career counselingThis blog post is the annual self-review by 80,000 Hours, originally written in December 2018. Publication was deferred because 80,000 Hours was waiting to hear back on the status of some large grants (in particular, one from the Open Philanthropy Project), but most of the content is still from the December 2018 draft. The post goes into detail about 80,000 Hours' progress in 2018, impact and plan changes, and future expansion plans. Funding gaps are discussed (the funding gap for 2019 is $400,000, and further money will be saved for 2020 and 2021). Grants from the Open Philanthropy Project, BERI, and the Effective Altruism Funds (EA Meta Fund) are mentioned
EA orgs are trying to fundraise ~$10m - $16m2019-01-06Hauke Hillebrandt Effective Altruism Forum Centre for Effective Altruism Effective Altruism Foundation Machine Intelligence Research Institute Forethought Foundation for Global Priorities Research Sentience Institute Alliance to Feed the Earth in Disasters Global Catastrophic Risk Institute Rethink Priorities EA Hotel 80,000 Hours Rethink Charity Miscellaneous commentaryThe blog post links to and discusses the spreadsheet https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/10zU6gp_H_zuvlZ2Vri-epSK0_urbcmdS-5th3mXQGXM/edit which tables various organizations and their fundraising targets, along with quotes and links to fundraising posts. The blog post itself has three points, the last of whichis that the EA community is relatively more funding constrained again
EA Giving Tuesday Donation Matching Initiative 2018 Retrospective2019-01-06Avi Norowitz Effective Altruism ForumAvi Norowitz William Kiely Against Malaria Foundation Malaria Consortium GiveWell Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund Alliance to Feed the Earth in Disasters Effective Animal Advocacy Fund The Humane League The Good Food Institute Animal Charity Evaluators Machine Intelligence Research Institute Faunalytics Wild-Aniaml Suffering Research GiveDirectly Center for Applied Rationality Effective Altruism Foundation Cool Earth Schistosomiasis Control Initiative New Harvest Evidence Action Centre for Effective Altruism Animal Equality Compassion in World Farming USA Innovations for Poverty Action Global Catastrophic Risk Institute Future of Life Institute Animal Charity Evaluators Recommended Charity Fund Sightsavers The Life You Can Save One Step for Animals Helen Keller International 80,000 Hours Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative Vegan Outreach Encompass Iodine Global Network Otwarte Klatki Charity Science Mercy For Animals Coalition for Rainforest Nations Fistula Foundation Sentience Institute Better Eating International Forethought Foundation for Global Priorities Research Raising for Effective Giving Clean Air Task Force The END Fund Miscellaneous commentaryThe blog post describes an effort by a number of donors coordinated at https://2018.eagivingtuesday.org/donations to donate through Facebook right after the start of donation matching on Giving Tuesday. Based on timestamps of donations and matches, donations were matched till 14 seconds after the start of matching. Despite the very short time window of matching, the post estimates that $469,000 (65%) of the donations made were matched
The world’s most intellectual foundation is hiring. Holden Karnofsky, founder of GiveWell, on how philanthropy can have maximum impact by taking big risks.2018-02-27Robert Wiblin Kieran Harris Holden Karnofsky 80,000 HoursOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyAI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness|Global health and development|Animal welfare|Scientific researchThis interview, with full transcript, is an episode of the 80,000 Hours podcast. In the interview, Karnofsky provides an overview of the cause prioritization and grantmaking strategy of the Open Philanthropy Project, and also notes that the Open Philanthropy Project is hiring for a number of positions
Annual review December 20172017-12-24Benjamin Todd 80,000 Hours 80,000 Hours Donee periodic updateEffective altruism/movement growth/career counseling80,000 Hours reviews its efforts in 2017 to push more people toward priority paths, both through writeups and through personalized coaching. Also announced at http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1j1/80000_hours_annual_review_released/
Suggestions for Individual Donors from Open Philanthropy Project Staff - 20172017-12-21Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectJaime Yassif Chloe Cockburn Lewis Bollard Nick Beckstead Daniel Dewey Center for International Security and Cooperation Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security Good Call Court Watch NOLA Compassion in World Farming USA Wild-Animal Suffering Research Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund Donor lottery Future of Humanity Institute Center for Human-Compatible AI Machine Intelligence Research Institute Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative Centre for Effective Altruism 80,000 Hours Alliance to Feed the Earth in Disasters Donation suggestion listAnimal welfare|AI safety|Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness|Effective altruism|Criminal justice reformOpen Philanthropy Project staff give suggestions on places that might be good for individuals to donate to. Each suggestion includes a section "Why I suggest it", a section explaining why the Open Philanthropy Project has not funded (or not fully funded) the opportunity, and links to relevant writeups
2017 AI Safety Literature Review and Charity Comparison2017-12-20Ben Hoskin Effective Altruism ForumBen Hoskin Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute Global Catastrophic Risk Institute Centre for the Study of Existential Risk AI Impacts Center for Human-Compatible AI Center for Applied Rationality Future of Life Institute 80,000 Hours Review of current state of cause areaAI safetyThe lengthy blog post covers all the published work of prominent organizations focused on AI risk. It is an annual refresh of https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/nSot23sAjoZRgaEwa/2016-ai-risk-literature-review-and-charity-comparison -- a similar post published a year before it. The conclusion: "Significant donations to the Machine Intelligence Research Institute and the Global Catastrophic Risks Institute. A much smaller one to AI Impacts."
How to end animal agriculture as soon as possible2017-09-27Robert Wiblin Lewis Bollard 80,000 HoursOpen Philanthropy Project Mercy For Animals Compassion in World Farming The Humane League The Humane Society of the United States Humane Society International The Good Food Institute Animal Equality Animal Charity Evaluators Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare/factory farmingPodcast with interview of Lewis Bollard (Farm Animal Welfare Program Officer at the Open Philanthropy Project) by Robert Wiblin of 80000 Hours, along with transcript. The podcast covers the strategy of the Open Philanthropy Project. 80000 Hours is an Open Philanthropy Project grant recipient and Wiblin was also on the board of Animal Charity Evaluators, an animal welfare-focused grant recipient that is discussed in the podcast
Fear and Loathing at Effective Altruism Global 20172017-08-16Scott Alexander Slate Star CodexOpen Philanthropy Project GiveWell Centre for Effective Altruism Center for Effective Global Action Raising for Effective Giving 80,000 Hours Wild-Animal Suffering Research Qualia Research Institute Foundational Research Institute Miscellaneous commentaryScott Alexander describes his experience at Effective ALtruism Global 2017. He describes how the effective altruism movement has both the formal-looking, "suits" people who are in charge of large amounts of money, and the "weirdos" who are toying around with ideas that seem strange and are not mainstream even within effective altruism. However, he feels that rather than being two separate groups, the two groups blend into and overlap with each other. He sees this as a sign that the effective altruism movement is composed of genuinely good people who are looking to make a difference, and explains why he thinks they are succeeding
Four quantiative models, aggregation, and final decision2017-05-20Tom Sittler Oxford Prioritisation ProjectOxford Prioritisation Project 80,000 Hours Animal Charity Evaluators Machine Intelligence Research Institute StrongMinds Single donation documentationEffective altruism/career adviceThe post describes how the Oxford Prioritisation Project compared its four finalists (80000 Hours, Animal Charity Evaluators, Machine Intelligence Research Institute, and StrongMinds) by building quantitative models for each, including modeling of uncertainties. Based on these quantitative models, 80000 Hours was chosen as the winner. Also posted to http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1ah/four_quantiative_models_aggregation_and_final/ for comments
A model of 80,000 Hours2017-05-14Sindy Li Oxford Prioritisation ProjectOxford Prioritisation Project 80,000 Hours Evaluator review of doneeEffective altruism/movement growthThe post supplements a model built in Guesstimate to estimate the impact of 80000 Hours. The model is a Monte Carlo model. Also posted to http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1a1/a_model_of_80000_hours_oxford_prioritisation/ for comments
Should we make a grant to a meta-charity?2017-03-11Daniel May Oxford Prioritisation ProjectOxford Prioritisation Project Giving What We Can 80,000 Hours Raising for Effective Giving Review of current state of cause areaEffective altruism/movement growth/fundraisingThe summary says: "I introduce the concept of meta-charity, discuss some considerations for OxPrio, and look into how meta-charities evaluate their impact, and the reliability of these figures for our purposes (finding the most cost-effective organisation to donate £10,000 today). I then look into the room for more funding for a few meta-charities, and finally conclude that these are worth seriously pursuing further." See http://effective-altruism.com/ea/189/daniel_may_should_we_make_a_grant_to_a/ for a cross-post that has comments
Introducing CEA’s Guiding Principles2017-03-07William MacAskill Centre for Effective AltruismEffective Altruism Foundation Rethink Charity Centre for Effective Altruism 80,000 Hours Animal Charity Evaluators Charity Science Effective Altruism Foundation Foundational Research Institute Future of Life Institute Raising for Effective Giving The Life You Can Save Miscellaneous commentaryEffective altruismWillam MacAskill outlines CEA's understanding of the guiding principles of effective altruism: commitment to others, scientific mindset, openness, integrity, and collaborative spirit. The post also lists other organizations that voice their support for these definitions and guiding principles, including: .impact, 80,000 Hours, Animal Charity Evaluators, Charity Science, Effective Altruism Foundation, Foundational Research Institute, Future of Life Institute, Raising for Effective Giving, and The Life You Can Save. The following individuals are also listed as voicing their support for the definition and guiding principles: Elie Hassenfeld of GiveWell and the Open Philanthropy Project, Holden Karnofsky of GiveWell and the Open Philanthropy Project, Toby Ord of the Future of Humanity Institute, Nate Soares of the Machine Intelligence Research Institute, and Peter Singer. William MacAskill worked on the document with Julia Wise, and also expresses gratitude to Rob Bensinger, Jeff Alstott, and Hilary Mayhew for their comments and wording suggestions. The post also briefly mentions an advisory panel set up by Julia Wise, and links to https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/mdMyPRSSzYgk7X45K/advisory-panel-at-cea for more detail
The effective altruism guide to donating this giving season2016-12-28Robert Wiblin 80,000 Hours Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense Cool Earth Alliance for Safety and Justice Cosecha Centre for Effective Altruism 80,000 Hours Animal Charity Evaluators Compassion in World Farming USA Against Malaria Foundation Schistosomiasis Control Initiative StrongMinds Ploughshares Fund Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute Evaluator consolidated recommendation listBiosecurity and pandemic preparedness,Global health and development,Animal welfare,AI risk,Global catastrophic risks,Effective altruism/movement growthRobert Wiblin draws on a number of annual charity evaluations and reviews, as well as staff donation writeups, from sources such as GiveWell and Animal Charity Evaluators, to provide an "effective altruism guide" for 2016 Giving Season donation
Why donate to 80,000 Hours2016-12-24Benjamin Todd 80,000 Hours 80,000 Hours Donee donation caseEffective altruism/movement growthMakes the case for 80000 Hours to be funded by effective altruists (and posted on the Effective Altruism Forum). Supplements their annual review https://80000hours.org/2016/12/annual-review-dec-2016 that provides the underlying data and narrative; however, the case made here explicitly focuses on argumentation appealing to EAs, and makes a clearer ask
Suggestions for Individual Donors from Open Philanthropy Project Staff - 20162016-12-14Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectJaime Yassif Chloe Cockburn Lewis Bollard Daniel Dewey Nick Beckstead Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense Alliance for Safety and Justice Cosecha Animal Charity Evaluators Compassion in World Farming USA Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute 80,000 Hours Ploughshares Fund Donation suggestion listAnimal welfare|AI safety|Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness|Effective altruism|Migration policyOpen Philanthropy Project staff describe suggestions for best donation opportunities for individual donors in their specific areas
2016 AI Risk Literature Review and Charity Comparison2016-12-13Ben Hoskin Effective Altruism ForumBen Hoskin Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute OpenAI Center for Human-Compatible AI Future of Life Institute Centre for the Study of Existential Risk Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence Global Catastrophic Risk Institute Global Priorities Project AI Impacts Xrisks Institute X-Risks Net Center for Applied Rationality 80,000 Hours Raising for Effective Giving Review of current state of cause areaAI safetyThe lengthy blog post covers all the published work of prominent organizations focused on AI risk. References https://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/global-catastrophic-risks/potential-risks-advanced-artificial-intelligence/machine-intelligence-research-institute-general-support#sources1007 for the MIRI part of it but notes the absence of information on the many other orgs. The conclusion: "The conclusion: "Donate to both the Machine Intelligence Research Institute and the Future of Humanity Institute, but somewhat biased towards the former. I will also make a smaller donation to the Global Catastrophic Risks Institute."
EAs write about where they give2016-12-09Julia Wise Effective Altruism ForumBlake Borgeson Eva Vivalt Ben Kuhn Alexander Gordon-Brown and Denise Melchin Elizabeth Van Nostrand Machine Intelligence Research Institute Center for Applied Rationality AidGrade Charity Science: Health 80,000 Hours Centre for Effective Altruism Tostan Periodic donation list documentationGlobal health and development, AI riskJulia Wise got submissions from multiple donors about their donation plans and put them together in a single post. The goal was to cover people outside of organizations that publish such posts for their employees
CEA Staff Donation Decisions 20162016-12-06Sam Deere Centre for Effective AltruismWilliam MacAskill Michelle Hutchinson Tara MacAulay Alison Woodman Seb Farquhar Hauke Hillebrandt Marinella Capriati Sam Deere Max Dalton Larissa Hesketh-Rowe Michael Page Stefan Schubert Pablo Stafforini Amy Labenz Centre for Effective Altruism 80,000 Hours Against Malaria Foundation Schistosomiasis Control Initiative Animal Charity Evaluators Charity Science Health New Incentives Project Healthy Children Deworm the World Initiative Machine Intelligence Research Institute StrongMinds Future of Humanity Institute Future of Life Institute Centre for the Study of Existential Risk Effective Altruism Foundation Sci-Hub Vote.org The Humane League Foundational Research Institute Periodic donation list documentationCentre for Effective Altruism (CEA) staff describe their donation plans. The donation amounts are not disclosed.
Where should you donate to have the most impact during giving season 2015?2015-12-24Robert Wiblin 80,000 Hours Against Malaria Foundation Giving What We Can GiveWell AidGrade Effective Altruism Outreach Animal Charity Evaluators Machine Intelligence Research Institute Raising for Effective Giving Center for Applied Rationality Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security Ploughshares Fund Future of Humanity Institute Future of Life Institute Centre for the Study of Existential Risk Charity Science Deworm the World Initiative Schistosomiasis Control Initiative GiveDirectly Evaluator consolidated recommendation listGlobal health and development,Effective altruism/movement growth,Rationality improvement,Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness,AI risk,Global catastrophic risksRobert Wiblin draws on GiveWell recommendations, Animal Charity Evaluators recommendations, Open Philanthropy Project writeups, staff donation writeups and suggestions, as well as other sources (including personal knowledge and intuitions) to come up with a list of places to donate
Want to make a real difference in development? AidGrade is hiring!2013-06-21Jess Whittlestone 80,000 Hours AidGrade Job advertisementGlobal health and developmentThe blog post contains a job advertisement for AidGrade, a nonprofit that was featured a couple days previously in an interview of its founder, Eva Vivalt: https://80000hours.org/2013/06/how-to-add-value-in-international-development-an-interview-with-eva-vivalt/
How to add value in international development: an interview with Eva Vivalt2013-06-19Jess Whittlestone Eva Vivalt 80,000 Hours AidGrade Evaluator quantification approachGlobal health and developmentThis is an interview of Eva Vivalt, founder of AidGrade, a nonprofit and eponymous website that provides summaries of various global health and development interventions by aggregating and summarizing a number of studies (i.e., doing a meta-analysis of sorts). Vivalt also talks in the interview of the major decisions of her life and career

Full list of donations in reverse chronological order (27 donations)

DonorAmount (current USD)Amount rank (out of 27)Donation dateCause areaURLInfluencerNotes
Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund200,000.0062019-08-23Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/3pxoLG7aRWtETC1lECC6LKLuke Ding Alex Foster Denise Melchin Matt Wage Donation process: Part of the July 2019 EA Meta Fund grants round. The grant page says: "7 of the 9 grantees in this round applied through this process." However, it is not clear if 80,000 Hours submitted an application, it may well be one of the two grantees that did not. It also seems that 80,000 Hours is considered as a grantee in each grant round; it received grants in all three previous grant rounds

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: 80,000 Hours plans to hirre 5 full-time equivalents (FTE) over 2019 and anothe 5 over 2020. The additional funding gives them the budget needed to pay for these hires

Donor reason for selecting the donee: Donor believes 80,000 Hours is one of the highest impact-per-dollar meta organizations, for reasons similar to those explained in previous grant rounds https://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/2dyBJqJBSIq6sAGU6gMYQW (November 2018) and https://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/1hVfcvrzRbpXUWYht4bu3b (March 2019)

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): The amount is similar to amounts granted in previous grant rounds; it is probably at the larger end of the amount the Meta Fund feels comfortable granting to a single organization in one grant round (the total amount granted in the grant round if $466,000, so this amount is around 43% of that total). Also, the amount ($200,000) fills half the funding shortfall of 80,000 Hours from the 2018 fundraiser (of $400,000)
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 42.90%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): The EA Meta Fund team is excited to see 80,000 Hours expand headcount and operations. Currently, the expansion is bottlenecked on money: "Right now, they cannot fully commit to hiring in 2020 as their expansion budget has not been filled. Ideally, they would already be searching for those hires, so they are being somewhat slowed down by their lack of funding."

Other notes:
Survival and Flourishing Fund280,000.0052019-08Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttp://survivalandflourishing.org/Alex Flint Andrew Critch Eric Rogstad Donation process: Part of the founding batch of grants for the Survival and Flourishing Fund made in August 2019. The fund is partly a successor to part of the grants program of the Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative (BERI) that handled grantmaking by Jaan Tallinn; see http://existence.org/tallinn-grants-future/ As such, this 80,000 Hours grant may represent a followup to a $350,000 grant made by BERI to 80,000 Hours earlier in the year

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Donor reason for selecting the donee: The grant may represent a followup to a $350,000 grant made by BERI to 80,000 Hours earlier in the year

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by timing of grant round; the Survival and Flourishing Fund is making its first round of grants in August 2019

Other notes: Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 100.00%; announced: 2019-08-29.
Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative350,000.0042019-04-22Career planninghttp://web.archive.org/web/20190623203105/http://existence.org/grants/-- The grant is mentioned by the recipient, 80,000 Hours, in a blog post https://80000hours.org/2019/05/annual-review-dec-2018/ along with grants from the Open Philanthropy Project and the Effective Altruism Funds Meta Fund.
Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund170,000.0072019-03-07Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/1hVfcvrzRbpXUWYht4bu3bLuke Ding Alex Foster Denise Melchin Matt Wage Tara MacAulay Donation process: This is part of the March 2019 grant round from the EA Meta Fund, comprising "a mixture of larger grants to more established meta groups and smaller grants to fund both younger organizations and specific projects." The grant to 80,000 Hours is among the "larger grants to more established meta groups"

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Donor reason for selecting the donee: Reasons for grant: (1) High impact per dollar, (2) Highly impactful and cost-effective in the past, for same reasons as discussed in https://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/2dyBJqJBSIq6sAGU6gMYQW (previous grant), (3) Undergoing significant growth, (4) Not yet filled funding gap, (5) Big potential upside is reducing talent bottlenecks in cause areas that are crucial and highly technically challenging. Other than (5), all the other reasons are shared as stated with another simultaneous grant made to Founders Pledge

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing largely determined by timing of the grant round. Also, it is relevant that 80,000 Hours has not yet filled its funding gap

Donor retrospective of the donation: The following $200,000 grant in the July 2019 grant round https://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/3pxoLG7aRWtETC1lECC6LK suggests that this grant would be considered a success

Other notes: Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 100.00%.
Open Philanthropy Project4,795,803.0012019-02Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2019Committee for Effective Altruism Support Donation process: The decision of whether to donate seems to have followed the Open Philanthropy Project's usual process, but the exact amount to donate was determined by the Committee for Effective Altruism Support using the process described at https://www.openphilanthropy.org/committee-effective-altruism-support

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: 80,000 Hours aims to solve skill bottlenecks for career paths in what it considers to be the world’s most pressing problems. It does this by providing online research, in-person advice, and support with the goal of helping talented graduates age 20-40 enter high-impact careers.

Donor reason for selecting the donee: Open Phil's grant writeup says: "we see the basic pros and cons of this support similarly to what we’ve presented in past writeups on the matter" and links to the February 2018 support https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2018

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): The amount is decided by the Committee for Effective Altruism Support https://www.openphilanthropy.org/committee-effective-altruism-support but individual votes and reasoning are not public. Two other grants with amounts decided by the Committee for Effective Altruism Support, made at the same time and therefore likely drawing from the same money pot, are to the Machine Intelligence Research Institute ($2,112,5000) and Centre for Effective Altruism ($2,756,250)

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Reasons for timing are not discussed, but likely include (1) It is about a year since the last grant to 80,000 Hours, and the grants are generally expected to last a year, so a renewal is due, (2) The Committee for Effective Altruism Support https://www.openphilanthropy.org/committee-effective-altruism-support did its first round of money allocation, so the timing is determined by the timing of that allocation round
Intended funding timeframe in months: 24

Other notes: Announced: 2019-03-28.
Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund45,000.00102018-11-29Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/2dyBJqJBSIq6sAGU6gMYQWLuke Ding Alex Foster Denise Melchin Matt Wage Tara MacAulay Donation process: Part of the November 2018 grant round from the EA Meta Fund. This is among the "larger grants" of the "mixture of larger grants to more established meta groups and smaller grants to younger organizations" that comprise the grant round. The grant page says: "We see this as our pilot round and hope this set of grants will signal the type of organizations to which the EA Meta Fund plans to donate."

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: Although the funding is unrestricted, the grant page says: "At the margin, this grant is expected to contribute towards the budget for their expanded team." It also says: "We think it’s likely that the Open Philanthropy Project will renew their funding of 80,000 Hours this year (although this isn’t confirmed), but their grant will be capped at 50-66% of the total amount raised. Because of this, there is a gap for other donors to fill, who will effectively receive 1:1 or 1:2 matching funding."

Donor reason for selecting the donee: The grant page lists 10 reasons: (1) Grantee has been impressive over the years. (2) Rapid growth of grantee since 2014. (3) Much larger budget for 2019 to support team expansion in 2019 and 2020. (4) Important work (supporting skilled people to pursue high-impact careers). (5) Carefully measured KPI to track their impact: impact-adjusted significant plan changes (IASPCs). (6) New focus on the highset priority career paths. (7) Excellent regular supporter updates (12 so far in 2018). (8) Great explanatory and advisory content that is helping people discover effective altruism. (9) Success at hiring and building a management team in 2018. (10) Marginal grants will go toward a new hire, which is particularly high-impact.

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): The total of $129,000 being distributed in this grant round from the EA Meta Fund is being distributed using a "mixture of larger grants to more established meta groups and smaller grants to younger organizations. For the more established groups, we believe there is strong evidence of their past impact and cost-effectiveness, room for more funding, and high probability that they will have an even greater positive impact in the future." 80,000 Hours receives the single largest grant, and a little over 1/3 of the total money
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 34.88%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by timing of the grant round. Also, the timing is particularly good for 80,000 Hours because of the historically large fundraising round 80,000 Hours has for 2019

Donor retrospective of the donation: Further grants in the next two grant rounds https://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/1hVfcvrzRbpXUWYht4bu3b and https://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/3pxoLG7aRWtETC1lECC6LK suggest that this grant would be considered a success

Other notes:
Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund75,818.0092018-08-14Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/ea-community/payouts/6M8SQFdecEm0WuAYweO2UQNick Beckstead Donation process: The grant from the EA Meta Fund is part of a final set of grant decisions being made by Nick Beckstead (granting $526,000 from the EA Meta Fund and $917,000 from the EA Long Term Future Fund) as he transitions out of managing both funds. Due to time constraints, Beckstead primarily relies on investigation of the organization done by the Open Philanthropy Project when making its 2017 grant https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support and 2018 renewal https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2018

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: Beckstead writes "I recommended these grants with the suggestion that these grantees look for ways to use funding to trade money for saving the time or increasing the productivity of their employees (e.g. subsidizing electronics upgrades or childcare), due to a sense that (i) their work is otherwise much less funding constrained than it used to be, and (ii) spending like this would better reflect the value of staff time and increase staff satisfaction. However, I also told them that I was open to them using these funds to accomplish this objective indirectly (e.g. through salary increases) or using the funds for another purpose if that seemed better to them."

Donor reason for selecting the donee: The grant page references https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2018 for Beckstead's opinion of the donee. This grant page is short, and in turn links to https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support which has a detailed Case for the grant section https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Case_for_the_grant that praises 80,000 Hours' track record in terms of impact-adjusted significant plan changes (IASPCs)

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): Beckstead is also recommending funding from the EA Long Term Future Fund of $91,450 for 80,000 Hours. The grant page says "The amounts I’m granting out to different organizations are roughly proportional to the number of staff they have, with some skew towards MIRI that reflects greater EA Funds donor interest in the Long-Term Future Fund." Also: "I think a number of these organizations could qualify for the criteria of either the Long-Term Future Fund or the EA Community Fund because of their dual focus on EA and longtermism, which is part of the reason that 80,000 Hours is receiving a grant from each fund."
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 14.41%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by the timing of this round of grants, which is in turn determined by the need for Beckstead to grant out the money before handing over management of the fund

Donor retrospective of the donation: Even after the fund management being moved to a new team, the EA Meta Fund would continue making grants to 80,000 Hours. In fact, 80,000 Hours would receive grant money in each of the three subsequent grant rounds. This suggests that the grant would be considered successful

Other notes:
Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund91,450.0082018-08-14Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/far-future/payouts/6g4f7iae5Ok6K6YOaAiyK0Nick Beckstead Donation process: The grant from the EA Long Term Future Fund is part of a final set of grant decisions being made by Nick Beckstead (granting $526,000 from the EA Meta Fund and $917,000 from the EA Long Term Future Fund) as he transitions out of managing both funds. Due to time constraints, Beckstead primarily relies on investigation of the organization done by the Open Philanthropy Project when making its 2017 grant https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support and 2018 renewal https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2018

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: Beckstead writes "I recommended these grants with the suggestion that these grantees look for ways to use funding to trade money for saving the time or increasing the productivity of their employees (e.g. subsidizing electronics upgrades or childcare), due to a sense that (i) their work is otherwise much less funding constrained than it used to be, and (ii) spending like this would better reflect the value of staff time and increase staff satisfaction. However, I also told them that I was open to them using these funds to accomplish this objective indirectly (e.g. through salary increases) or using the funds for another purpose if that seemed better to them."

Donor reason for selecting the donee: The grant page references https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2018 for Beckstead's opinion of the donee. This grant page is short, and in turn links to https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support which has a detailed Case for the grant section https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Case_for_the_grant that praises 80,000 Hours' track record in terms of impact-adjusted significant plan changes (IASPCs)

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): Beckstead is also recommending funding from the EA Meta Fund of $75,818 for 80,000 Hours. The grant page says "The amounts I’m granting out to different organizations are roughly proportional to the number of staff they have, with some skew towards MIRI that reflects greater EA Funds donor interest in the Long-Term Future Fund." Also: "I think a number of these organizations could qualify for the criteria of either the Long-Term Future Fund or the EA Community Fund because of their dual focus on EA and longtermism, which is part of the reason that 80,000 Hours is receiving a grant from each fund."
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 9.97%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by the timing of this round of grants, which is in turn determined by the need for Beckstead to grant out the money before handing over management of the fund

Donor retrospective of the donation: Even after the fund management being moved to a new team, the EA Meta Fund would continue making grants to 80,000 Hours. In fact, 80,000 Hours would receive grant money in each of the three subsequent grant rounds. However, the EA Long Term Future Fund would make no further grants to 80,000 Hours. This suggests that the selection of the grantee as a Long Term Future Fund grantee would not continue to be endorsed by the new management team

Other notes:
Open Philanthropy Project510,000.0032018-02Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2018Nick Beckstead Nicole Ross Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: No explicitly listed priority uses of the funds, but likely similar to the grant https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support that it is renewing

Donor reason for selecting the donee: Likely the same reasons as for the 2017 grant that this is renewing; see https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Case_for_the_grant The key reason is that Open Phil finds impressive the large number of impact-adjusted significant plan changes (IASPCs) that 80,000 Hours claims to have brought about, and broadly agrees with 80,000 Hours' calculation of their IASPCs

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): Amount determined by the amount ($510,000) raised from other donors in 2017, which turned out to be the smallest of the three constraining amounts described in the previous grant page https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Case_for_the_grant "We expect to recommend another grant to 80,000 Hours at the beginning of 2018, with the amount recommended being whichever of the following is smallest: (1) $1.25 million (2) The amount 80,000 Hours raises from other donors in 2017 (3) The amount necessary for 80,000 Hours to have $3.75 million in its bank account"

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing as pre-committed on the previous grant page https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Case_for_the_grant "We expect to recommend another grant to 80,000 Hours at the beginning of 2018"

Donor retrospective of the donation: The followup grant https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2019 for $4,795,803 in February 2019 (amount determined by the Committee for Effective Altruism Support) suggests general satisfaction with the grantee and the grant

Other notes: Announced: 2018-02-22.
Oxford Prioritisation Project12,934.00172017-05-09Effective altruism/movement growthhttps://oxpr.io/blog/2017/5/20/four-quantiative-models-aggregation-and-final-decision-- Donation process: The donation is the outcome of the Oxford Prioritisation Project, a months-long group project that looks at a number of donation targets to find the best one. The donation amount of 10,000 GBP was pre-determined. 80,000 Hours is the ultimate winner and gets the entire amount

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Donor reason for selecting the donee: The selection of 80,000 Hours as the target for the donation is a result of a lengthy process of deliberation and comparison. The final stage of comparison includes four charities: 80,000 Hours, Machine Intelligence Research Institute, StrongMinds, and Animal Charity Evaluators. The final comparison is carried out though a quantitative analysis summarized at https://oxpr.io/blog/2017/5/20/expected-value-estimates-we-cautiously-took-literally The post describing the model for 80,000 Hours is at https://oxpr.io/blog/2017/5/13/a-model-of-80000-hours

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): Amount (of 10,0000 GBP) determined at the outset of the Oxford Prioritisation Project, as the donation amount that the project seeks to allocate

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by the end of the time period for the Oxford Prioritisation Project

Donor retrospective of the donation: See https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/JfDW9LfcMFGXhLxTC/a-model-of-80-000-hours-oxford-prioritisation-project for a retrospective on the Oxford Prioritisation Project. 80,000 Hours is mentioned only once in the retrospective: "We would guess that the real costs of the £10,000 grant were low. At the outset, the probability was quite high that the money would eventually be granted to a high-impact organisation, with a cost-effectiveness not several times smaller than CEA’s counterfactual use of the money3. In fact, the grant was given to 80,000 Hours."

Other notes: Announced: 2017-05-09.
Open Philanthropy Project1,125,000.0022017-03Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-supportNick Beckstead Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: According to https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Budget_and_proposed_activities grantee plans to use the grant to fund the following activities: (1) Hiring four new junior staff members to (a) improve career guides and career profiles, (b) do career coaching, (c) replacing a departing part-time software engineer, (d) research/career coaching/marketing. (2) Increasing staff salaries by 30% to be competitive in the Bay Area, to which it recently moved. (3) Marketing activities including online retargeting advertisements, Facebook advertisements for workshops targeted at universities, and giving away books. (4) Holding funds in reserve for year 2

Donor reason for selecting the donee: https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Case_for_the_grant explains the reasons. The key reason is that Open Phil finds impressive the large number of impact-adjusted significant plan changes (IASPCs) that 80,000 Hours claims to have brought about, and broadly agrees with 80,000 Hours' calculation of their IASPCs

Donor thoughts on making further donations to the donee: According to https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support#Case_for_the_grant "We expect to recommend another grant to 80,000 Hours at the beginning of 2018, with the amount recommended being whichever of the following is smallest: (1) $1.25 million (2) The amount 80,000 Hours raises from other donors in 2017 (3) The amount necessary for 80,000 Hours to have $3.75 million in its bank account"

Donor retrospective of the donation: The renewal grant https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/80000-hours-general-support-2018 of $510,000 is consistent with the expectations set during this grant; the constraining factor in determining the amount for the renewal is "The amount 80,000 Hours raises from other donors in 2017"

Other notes: Announced: 2017-05-16.
Raymond Arnold200.00212016Career coaching/life guidancehttps://github.com/peterhurford/ea-data/--
Haseeb Qureshi25,300.00142016Effective altruism/movement growthhttp://haseebq.com/2016-donations-and-some-thoughts/-- Donation process: The announcement post says: "In 2016, my donations totaled $50,600. My finances this year were little more complicated, but that was my best estimate of 33% of my pre-tax income. (That income does not include RSUs; whenever I can liquidate them, I will also donate 33% of their value.) Below are the organizations I donated to and why."

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: The announcement post says: "80K is an organization that advises young people on how to do the most good with their careers. They analyze different career paths, balancing career capital with altruistic aims."

Donor reason for selecting the donee: The announcement post says: "80K actually strongly affected my own trajectory when I was considering career pursuits. Reading through their career guide on tech entrepreneurship influenced my original decision to enter into the tech industry. 80K has had had impressive growth and has done a lot of good for influencing more students on the path to altruistic lives. There’s a big talent gap in effective altruism right now, and 80K seems like the best investment for filling that gap. I’m excited to see what they can do in 2017."

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): The total amount the donor is giving away is $50,600, which is 33% of pre-tax income. The allocation of 50% to 80,000 Hours is likely determined by the needs of other recipients; it is also consistent with the percentage allocated the previous year for EA Outreach
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 50.00%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): End-of-year round of donations of 33% of income in the year; this is part of the donor's earning-to-give strategy

Other notes: Announced: 2017-01-29.
Mark Barnes26,291.57132016Career coaching/life guidancehttps://github.com/peterhurford/ea-data/--
Saulius Šimčikas2,464.84182016Career coaching/life guidancehttps://github.com/peterhurford/ea-data/--
Sophia Cyna159.43222016Career coaching/life guidancehttps://github.com/peterhurford/ea-data/--
EA Giving Group----2016Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1H2hF3SaO0_QViYq2j1E7mwoz3sDjdf9pdtuBcrq7pRU/editNick Beckstead Actual date range: December 2015 to February 2016. Exact date, amount, or fraction not known, but it is the donee with the second highest amount donated out of six donees in this period.
EA Giving Group----2016Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1H2hF3SaO0_QViYq2j1E7mwoz3sDjdf9pdtuBcrq7pRU/editNick Beckstead Actual date range: February 2016 to December 2016. Exact date, amount, or fraction not known, but it is the donee with the second highest amount donated out of three donees in this period.
Patrick Brinich-Langlois1,692.42192015-10-06--https://www.patbl.com/misc/other/donations/--
Patrick Brinich-Langlois38,307.58112015-08-24--https://www.patbl.com/misc/other/donations/-- Grant from The Eleemosynary Flying Orang−Utans Fund.
Mark Barnes13,145.79162015Career coaching/life guidancehttps://github.com/peterhurford/ea-data/--
Peter Hurford100.00232014-12-19Effective altruism/movement growthhttp://peterhurford.com/other/donations.html--
Patrick Brinich-Langlois30,000.00122014-01-08--https://www.patbl.com/misc/other/donations/--
EA Giving Group----2014Effective altruism/movement growth/career counselinghttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1H2hF3SaO0_QViYq2j1E7mwoz3sDjdf9pdtuBcrq7pRU/editNick Beckstead Actual date range: December 2013 to December 2014. Exact date, amount, or fraction not known, but it is the donee with the highest amount donated out of five donees in this period.
Peter Hurford80.00242013-12-12Effective altruism/movement growthhttp://peterhurford.com/other/donations.html--
Jeff Kaufman and Julia Wise21,053.00152012-11-07--https://www.jefftk.com/donations--
Patrick Brinich-Langlois500.00202012-11-06--https://www.patbl.com/misc/other/donations/--