Institute for Local Self-Reliance donations received

This is an online portal with information on donations that were announced publicly (or have been shared with permission) that were of interest to Vipul Naik. The git repository with the code for this portal, as well as all the underlying data, is available on GitHub. All payment amounts are in current United States dollars (USD). The repository of donations is being seeded with an initial collation by Issa Rice as well as continued contributions from him (see his commits and the contract work page listing all financially compensated contributions to the site) but all responsibility for errors and inaccuracies belongs to Vipul Naik. Current data is preliminary and has not been completely vetted and normalized; if sharing a link to this site or any page on this site, please include the caveat that the data is preliminary (if you want to share without including caveats, please check with Vipul Naik). We expect to have completed the first round of development by the end of March 2022. See the about page for more details. Also of interest: pageview data on analytics.vipulnaik.com, tutorial in README, request for feedback to EA Forum.

Table of contents

Basic donee information

We do not have any donee information for the donee Institute for Local Self-Reliance in our system.

Donee donation statistics

Cause areaCountMedianMeanMinimum10th percentile 20th percentile 30th percentile 40th percentile 50th percentile 60th percentile 70th percentile 80th percentile 90th percentile Maximum
Overall 18 45,000 65,778 19,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 40,000 45,000 50,000 50,000 150,000 150,000 150,000
Environment 11 30,000 40,818 19,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 100,000
Job Opportunities 1 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000
2 45,000 47,500 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000
FIXME 4 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000

Donation amounts by donor and year for donee Institute for Local Self-Reliance

Donor Total 2018 2016 2014 2012 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2000 1991
Ford Foundation (filter this donee) 600,000.00 150,000.00 150,000.00 150,000.00 150,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
John Merck Fund (filter this donee) 509,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 50,000.00 50,000.00 30,000.00 80,000.00 30,000.00 30,000.00 80,000.00 19,000.00 140,000.00 0.00
Surdna Foundation (filter this donee) 45,000.00 0.00 0.00 45,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Nathan Cummings Foundation (filter this donee) 30,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 30,000.00
Total 1,184,000.00 150,000.00 150,000.00 195,000.00 150,000.00 50,000.00 50,000.00 30,000.00 80,000.00 30,000.00 30,000.00 80,000.00 19,000.00 140,000.00 30,000.00

Full list of donations in reverse chronological order (18 donations)

Graph of top 10 donors by amount, showing the timeframe of donations

Graph of donations and their timeframes
DonorAmount (current USD)Amount rank (out of 18)Donation dateCause areaURLInfluencerNotes
Ford Foundation150,000.0012018-04-01FIXMEhttp://www.fordfoundation.org/work/our-grants/grants-database/grants-all-- Core support for the Community Broadband Networks Initiative to advance locally-owned, democratically accountable networks offering universal access to fast, affordable Internet in the U.S. Affected regions: 1045###United States###100; 9177456###No Intention@@@9190990###No Intention; United States; affected countries: FIXME.
Ford Foundation150,000.0012016-04-01FIXMEhttp://www.fordfoundation.org/work/our-grants/grants-database/grants-all-- Core support for the Community Broadband Networks Initiative to advance locally-owned, democratically accountable networks offering universal access to fast, affordable Internet in the U.S. Affected regions: 1045###United States###100; 9177456###No Intention@@@; United States; affected countries: FIXME.
Ford Foundation150,000.0012014-04-01FIXMEhttp://www.fordfoundation.org/work/our-grants/grants-database/grants-all-- For the Community Broadband Networks Initiative to educate the public on the advantages of publicly owned broadband and support the development of new community fiber networks. Affected regions: 1045###United States###100; 9177456###No Intention@@@9177887###Racial ethnic minority; United States; affected countries: FIXME.
Surdna Foundation45,000.00102014--https://surdna.org/grants-database/-- To support the Institute for Local Self-Reliance to produce policy research and popular education materials for key stakeholders, mobilize business groups to advance policy change, and support a national convening of 25 stakeholders, policy analysts, and organizers to craft a shared policy agenda. Duration: 12 months.
Ford Foundation150,000.0012012-01-01FIXMEhttp://www.fordfoundation.org/work/our-grants/grants-database/grants-all-- For the Telecommunications as Commons Initiative to educate the public on the comparative advantages of publicly owned broadband, promote the creation of new community networks & assist existing ones. Affected regions: 1045###United States###100; 9177456###No Intention@@@9177887###Racial ethnic minority; United States; affected countries: FIXME.
John Merck Fund50,000.0062009-06Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To educate purchasers, policymakers and environmental and public health activists about the benefits and tradeoffs of biomaterials, and to guide the marketplace toward sustainable products.
John Merck Fund50,000.0062008-06Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To enable the Sustainable Biomaterials Collaborative to spur the introduction and use of biomaterials that are sustainable throughout their life cycle by creating sustainability guidelines, building markets and promoting policy initiatives.
John Merck Fund30,000.00122007-09Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To accelerate market demand for healthier building materials.
John Merck Fund50,000.0062006-12--https://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To build environmentally friendly, affordable housing for low-income Mississippi residents displaced by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
John Merck Fund30,000.00122006-06Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To ensure that emerging green building standards incorporate health-based criteria by eliminating building materials that release toxic chemicals into the environment; and to encourage the health care, religious and affordable housing sectors to use those criteria in their building programs.
John Merck Fund30,000.00122005-04Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To ensure that emerging green building standards incorporate health-based criteria that recommend and/or reward the elimination of building materials responsible for bioaccumulative toxic releases to the environment, such as mercury and dioxin; and to encourage the health care, religious and affordable housing sectors to use those criteria in their building programs as well.
John Merck Fund30,000.00122004-12Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To strengthen and develop policies for eliminating and cleaning up persistent toxic chemicals in the State of Washington.
John Merck Fund30,000.00122003-12Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To strengthen and build policies for eliminating and cleaning up persistent toxic chemicals in the State of Washington.
John Merck Fund50,000.0062003-04Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To support the Healthy Building Network, which will establish health-based building standards, in both private and public sectors, applicable to health care facilities, faith-based institutions, and affordable housing; work to eliminate the use of building materials that harm environmental health throughout their lifecycle, especially PVC plastic and others associated with persistent bioaccumulative toxins; and engage and organize new constituencies, in particular green building professionals, health care professionals, faith leaders, affordable housing advocated and organized labor in the transition to safe alternatives.
John Merck Fund19,000.00182002-12Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To implement a multi-year strategy for eliminating and cleaning up persistent toxic chemicals in the State of Washington.
John Merck Fund40,000.00112000-12Job Opportunitieshttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To train and either place or create jobs for 30 low-income individuals in deconstruction ventures in several Northeast communities. Deconstruction is an environmentally responsible approach to taking down buildings in which building materials are salvaged and sold for reuse.
John Merck Fund100,000.0052000-07Environmenthttps://www.jmfund.org/program-grants/-- To eliminate polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastic and formaldehyde from use in the construction of new buildings. PVC produces dioxin, a potent carcinogen and endocrine disrupter, during its manufacture and disposal. Building materials now account for 75 percent of PVC use. In contrast, its use in medical settings, the focus of Health Care Without Harm, accounts for only 5 percent of the total.
Nathan Cummings Foundation30,000.00121991Environment/Farming / Forestry / Wastehttps://web.archive.org/web/20081201112446/http://www.nathancummings.org/annual91/000198.html-- To help three cities maximize recycling programs and recruit scrap-based manufacturers.