Open Philanthropy Project donations received

This is an online portal with information on donations that were announced publicly (or have been shared with permission) that were of interest to Vipul Naik. The git repository with the code for this portal, as well as all the underlying data, is available on GitHub. All payment amounts are in current United States dollars (USD). The repository of donations is being seeded with an initial collation by Issa Rice as well as continued contributions from him (see his commits and the contract work page listing all financially compensated contributions to the site) but all responsibility for errors and inaccuracies belongs to Vipul Naik. Current data is preliminary and has not been completely vetted and normalized; if sharing a link to this site or any page on this site, please include the caveat that the data is preliminary (if you want to share without including caveats, please check with Vipul Naik). We expect to have completed the first round of development by the end of March 2020. See the about page for more details. Also of interest: pageview data on analytics.vipulnaik.com, tutorial in README, request for feedback to EA Forum.

Table of contents

Basic donee information

We do not have any donee information for the donee Open Philanthropy Project in our system.

This entity is also a donor.

Donee donation statistics

Cause areaCountMedianMeanMinimum10th percentile 20th percentile 30th percentile 40th percentile 50th percentile 60th percentile 70th percentile 80th percentile 90th percentile Maximum
Overall 0 0 nan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Donation amounts by donor and year for donee Open Philanthropy Project

Donor Total
Total 0.00

Full list of documents in reverse chronological order (57 documents)

Title (URL linked)Publication dateAuthorPublisherAffected donorsAffected doneesDocument scopeCause areaNotes
Questions We Ask Ourselves Before Making a Grant2019-08-06Michael Levine Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Sandler Foundation Center for Security and Emerging Technology University of Washington (Institute for Protein Design) Broad donor strategyMichael Levine describes some guidance that the Open Philanthropy Project has put together for program officers on questions to consider before making a grant. This complements guidance published three years ago about internal grant writeups: https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/our-grantmaking-so-far-approach-and-process
GiveWell’s Top Charities Are (Increasingly) Hard to Beat2019-07-09Alexander Berger Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project GiveDirectly Against Malaria Foundation Schistosomiasis Control Initiative Target Malaria JustLeadershipUSA Broad donor strategyGlobal health and development|Criminal justice reform|Scientific researchIn the blog post, Alexander Berger discusses how, originally, Open Philanthropy Project donations for near-term human well-being (primarily in the areas of criminal justice reform and scientific research) are compared against a cost-effectiveness benchmark of direct cash transfers, which is set as 100x (every $1 donated should yield $100 in benefits). However, since GiveWell has recently made its cost-effectiveness calculations for top charities more thorough, and now estimates that top charities are 5-15x as cost-effective as cash (or 500-1500x, with 1000x as a median), Berger is now comparing all the existing near-term human well-being grants against the 1000x benchmarks. He finds that, using the back-of-the-envelope calculations (BOTECs) done at the time of justifying the grants, many of the criminal justice reform grants do not clear the bar; in total only $32 million of the grants clears the bar, and about half of it is a single grant to Target Malaria. Berger links to https://docs.google.com/document/d/1GsE2_TNWn0x6MWL1PTdkZT2vQNFW8VFBslC5qjk4sgo/edit?ts=5cc10604 for some sample BOTECs
Explaining Our Bet on Sherlock Biosciences’ Innovations in Viral Diagnostics2019-06-10Heather Youngs Chris Somerville Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Sherlock Biosciences Single donation documentationScientific researchIn this new-style blog post, the reasons for the Open Philanthropy Project grant https://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/scientific-research/miscellaneous/sherlock-biosciences-research-viral-diagnostics to Sherlock Biosciences are explained in a conversational style. The conversation participants include Michael Levine (Communications Officer) and the grant investigators Chris Somerville and Heather Youngs
Our Progress in 2018 and Plans for 20192019-04-15Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCriminal justice reform|Animal welfareThe post compares progress made by the Open Philanthropy Project in 2018 against plans laid out in https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/our-progress-2017-and-plans-2018 and then lays out plans for 2019. The post notes that grantmaking was sustained at over $100 million. Hints of impact in the areas of criminal justice reform and animal welfare continue to be seen. Hiring to grow research analyst capacity was a top focus, led by Luke Muehlhauser, with the results detailed in the blog post https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/reflections-our-2018-generalist-research-analyst-recruiting by Muehlhauser. Operations capacity grew significantly under Beth Jones, who joined in May as Director of Operations
Committee for Effective Altruism Support2019-02-27Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Centre for Effective Altruism Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative Center for Applied Rationality Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute Broad donor strategyEffective altruism|AI safetyThe document announces a new approach to setting grant sizes for the largest grantees who are "in the effective altruism community" including both organizations explicitly focused on effective altruism and other organizations that are favorites of and deeply embedded in the community, including organizations working in AI safety. The committee comprises Open Philanthropy staff and trusted outside advisors who are knowledgeable about the relevant organizations. Committee members review materials submitted by the organizations; gather to discuss considerations, including room for more funding; and submit “votes” on how they would allocate a set budget between a number of grantees (they can also vote to save part of the budget for later giving). Votes of committee members are averaged to arrive at the final grant amounts. Example grants whose size was determined by the community is the two-year support to the Machine Intelligence Research Institute (MIRI) https://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/global-catastrophic-risks/potential-risks-advanced-artificial-intelligence/machine-intelligence-research-institute-general-support-2019 and one-year support to the Centre for Effective Altruism (CEA) https://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/centre-effective-altruism-general-support-2019
Suggestions for Individual Donors from Open Philanthropy Project Staff - 20182018-12-20Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectChloe Cockburn Lewis Bollard Amanda Hungerford Alexander Berger Luke Muelhhauser National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls Texas Organizing Project Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund The Humane League Center for Global Development International Refugee Assistance Project Donor lottery Donation suggestion listCriminal justice reform|Animal welfare|Global health and development|Migration policy|Effective altruismOpen Philanthropy Project staff give suggestions on places that might be good for individuals to donate to. Each suggestion includes a section "Why I suggest it", a section explaining why the Open Philanthropy Project has not funded (or not fully funded) the opportunity, and links to relevant writeups. The post continues a tradition of similar posts published once a year
Update on Partnerships with External Donors2018-05-16Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Future Justice Fund Accountable Justice Action Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund Accountable Justice Action Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund Miscellaneous commentaryCriminal justice reform,Animal welfareThe Open Philanthropy Project describes how it works with donors other than Good Ventures (the foundation under Dustin Moskovitz and Cari Tuna that accounts for almost all Open Phil grantmaking). The blog post reiterates that the long-term goal is to inform many different funders, but that is not a short-term priority because the Open Philanthropy Project is not moving enough money to even achieve the total spend that Good Ventures is willing to go up to. The post mentions that Chloe Cockburn, the program officer for criminal justice reform, is working with other funders in criminal justice reform, and they have created a separate vehicle, the Accountable Justice Action Fund, to pool resources. Also, Mike and Kaitlyn Krieger, who previously worked with the Open Philanthropy Project, now have their own criminal justice-focused Future Justice Fund, and are getting help from Cockburn to allocate money from the fund. For causes outside of criminal justice reform, the role of Effective Altruism Funds (whose grantmaking is managed by Open Philanthropy Project staff members) is mentioned. Also, Lewis Bollard is said to have moved ~10% as much money through advice to other donors as he has moved through the Open Philanthropy Project
Managing Funder-Grantee Dynamics Responsibly2018-03-30Michael Levine Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Miscellaneous commentaryMichael Levine of the Open Philanthropy Project discusses how big donors (like the Open Philanthropy Project) can unduly influence the plans of existing and potential grantees, and what the organization is doing to mitigate that impact
Our Progress in 2017 and Plans for 20182018-03-20Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCriminal justice reform|Animal welfare|Scientific research|Cause prioritizationThe post compares progress made by the Open Philanthropy Project in 2017 against plans laid out in https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/our-progress-2016-and-plans-2017 and then lays out plans fo 2018. The post notes that grantmaking was sustained at the expected level of over $100 million, and that hints of impact are being seen in the areas where they would be expected, namely criminal justice reform and animal welfare. Deep independent investigations, such as https://www.openphilanthropy.org/files/Focus_Areas/Criminal_Justice_Reform/The_impacts_of_incarceration_on_crime_10.pdf by David Roodman for criminal justice reform and https://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/us-policy/farm-animal-welfare/how-will-hen-welfare-be-impacted-transition-cage-free-housing by Ajeya Cotra for animal welfare, are highlighted. Scientific research is identified as an area of strong progress, with the transformative R01 second chance program https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/our-second-chance-program-nih-transformative-research-applicants highlighted. The separation from GiveWell was completed in 2017. For 2018, hiring is a top priority, while the level of giving is expected to be maintained at the current level of over $100 million
An Update to How We’re Thinking About Grant Check-Ins2018-03-09Morgan Davis Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Miscellaneous commentaryMorgan Davis of the Open Philanthropy Project describes the process that the organization uses to check in on and learn from past grants. A check-in has three goals: updates (most frequent, and quite minor), lessons (less frequent, more important, and more wide-ranging), and impact (most rare, but really important when it occurs)
New Job Opportunities2018-02-14Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Job advertisementHolden Karnofsky links to job opening pages for generalist Research Analyst and Senior Research Analyst roles, specialized roles related to AI risk, roles such as Grants Associate, Operations Associate, and General Counsel, and the Director of Operations
Update on Cause Prioritization at Open Philanthropy2018-01-26Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCause prioritizationThis very long blog post describes how the Open Philanthropy Project currently views its trade-off between near-termist human welfare, near-termist animal welfare, and long-termism. It also discusses allocation to different causes within these broad cause types. It builds upon ideas discussed at http://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/worldview-diversification and http://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/good-ventures-and-giving-now-vs-later-2016-update
Fish: The Forgotten Farm Animal2018-01-18Lewis Bollard Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare/factory farming/fishThe blog post, cross-posted from a newsletter published by the author, makes the case that fish welfare is neglected within the domain of factory farming, and provides suggestions for how to address that problem, including suggestions that the Open Philanthropy Project (where Bollard is the Program Officer for Farm Animal Welfare) is acting upon
Suggestions for Individual Donors from Open Philanthropy Project Staff - 20172017-12-21Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectJaime Yassif Chloe Cockburn Lewis Bollard Nick Beckstead Daniel Dewey Center for International Security and Cooperation Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security Good Call Court Watch NOLA Compassion in World Farming USA Wild-Animal Suffering Research Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund Donor lottery Future of Humanity Institute Center for Human-Compatible AI Machine Intelligence Research Institute Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative Centre for Effective Altruism 80,000 Hours Alliance to Feed the Earth in Disasters Donation suggestion listAnimal welfare|AI safety|Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness|Effective altruism|Criminal justice reformOpen Philanthropy Project staff give suggestions on places that might be good for individuals to donate to. Each suggestion includes a section "Why I suggest it", a section explaining why the Open Philanthropy Project has not funded (or not fully funded) the opportunity, and links to relevant writeups
Our ‘Second Chance’ Program for NIH Transformative Research Applicants2017-12-20Heather Youngs Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Arizona State University University of Notre Dame Rockefeller University Univesity of California San Francisco Broad donor strategyScientific research/transformative R01The blog post describes a "second chance" program that the Open Philanthropy Project ran for rejected applications to the National Institutes of Health transformative R01 program https://commonfund.nih.gov/tra Four grants were made based on this, totaling $10.8 million. The grants were also covered in Nature at https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-017-08795-0
Staff Members’ Personal Donations for Giving Season 20172017-12-18Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectHolden Karnofsky Alexander Berger Nick Beckstead Helen Toner Claire Zabel Lewis Bollard Ajeya Cotra Morgan Davis Michael Levine GiveWell top charities GiveWell GiveDirectly EA Giving Group Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative Effective Altruism Funds: Meta Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Long-Term Future Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Animal Welfare Fund Effective Altruism Funds: Global Health and Development Fund Sentience Institute Encompass The Humane League The Good Food Institute Mercy For Animals Compassion in World Farming USA Animal Equality Donor lottery Against Malaria Foundation GiveDirectly Periodic donation list documentationOpen Philanthropy Project staff members describe where they are donating this year, and the considerations that went into the donation decision. By policy, amounts are not disclosed. This is the first standalone blog post of this sort by the Open Philanthropy Project; in previous years, the corresponding donations were documented in the GiveWell staff members donation post
Reasoning Transparency2017-12-12Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Reasoning supplementThe document describes what sort of document structure for discourse and research exposition is most helpful to the Open Philanthropy Project as a consumer of the work. Announced at https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/i2F6YxE14O8
Update on Investigating Neglected Goals in Biological Research2017-11-30Nick Beckstead Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Good Ventures/not recommended by GiveWell or Open Philanthropy Project Target Malaria Broad donor strategyScientific research,Global health,Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness,AgricultureThe blog post describes the way the Open Philanthropy Project is identifying neglected goals in biological research. Previously the hope was to investigate sub-areas deeply and produce write-ups. Now, the approach is more "opportunistic": rather than do public write-ups, staff look out for good opportunities for shovel-ready or highly promising grants in the specific topics identified as having strong potential
The impacts of inacercation on crime2017-09-25David Roodman Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Reasoning supplementCriminal justice reformThe document reviews three mechanisms through which incarceration might reduce crime: deterrence, incapacitation, and aftereffects. It is also published in the form of four blog posts https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/reasonable-doubt-new-look-whether-prison-growth-cuts-crime https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/deterrence-de-minimis https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/incapacitation-how-much-does-putting-people-inside-prison-cut-crime-outside https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/aftereffects-us-evidence-says-doing-more-time-typically-leads-more-crime-after and is also available as http://files.openphilanthropy.org/files/Focus_Areas/Criminal_Justice_Reform/impacts_of_incarceration_v4.mobi (Kindle) and http://files.openphilanthropy.org/files/Focus_Areas/Criminal_Justice_Reform/impacts_of_incarceration_v4.epub (Mobi)
How Will Hen Welfare Be Impacted by the Transition to Cage-Free Housing?2017-09-15Ajeya Cotra Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Reasoning supplementAnimal welfare/factory farming/chicken/cage-free campaignA followup to https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/initial-grants-support-corporate-cage-free-reforms which described the original cage-free campaign funding strategy. This report compares aviaries (cage-free living environments) with cages for hens. It tempers original enthusiasm for cage-free by noting higher mortality rates, but continues to support the position that cage-free is likely better on net for hens. Described in blog post https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/new-report-welfare-differences-between-cage-and-cage-free-housing that expresses regret for not investigating this more thoroughly earlier, and thanks Direct Action Everywhere for highlighting the issue. See https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/cnK5yNlYHuc for the announcement
The Open Philanthropy Project AI Fellows Program2017-09-12Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyAI safetyThis annouces an AI Fellows Program to support students doing Ph.D. work in AI-related fields who have interest in AI safety. See https://www.facebook.com/vipulnaik.r/posts/10213116327718748 and https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/long-term-world-improvement/FeZ_h2HXJr0 for critical discussions
Relationship Disclosure Policy2017-08-30Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Miscellaneous commentaryThe document, announced on a mailing list at https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/4-0KIw2aVmQ (2017-08-30) describes a change in relationship disclosure policy on grant pages published by the Open Philanthropy Project. Relationship disclosures would now no longer be included on grant pages. See https://www.facebook.com/vipulnaik.r/posts/10212973153219475 (cross-posted at https://github.com/vipulnaik/working-drafts/blob/master/open-phil/relationship-disclosure-policy.txt to GitHub) for a critique
Grants to Support Farm Animal Welfare Work in China2017-08-09Lewis Bollard Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Compassion in World Farming WildAid World Animal Protection Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Humane Slaughter Association Jeanne Marchig Centre Animal Welfare Standards Project Green Monday Griffith University Brighter Green Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare/factory farming/ChinaThe document describes the strategy of the Open Philanthropy Project to focus on farm animal welfare advocacy in China, and lists ten grants that are part of this strategy. It is announced 2017-08-09 at https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/ngrjni1iKLg on the mailing list; this comes 9.5 months after the strategy was unofficially announced by Lewis Bollard at https://www.facebook.com/groups/EffectiveAnimalActivism/permalink/656583861179155/ (2016-10-25) on Facebook
The Open Philanthropy Project Is Now an Independent Organization2017-06-12Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Good Ventures Status changeThe Open Philanthropy Project announces that it is now a separate entity from GiveWell, and that it has incorporated as a LLC. The change was effective 2017-06-01. See https://blog.givewell.org/2017/06/12/separating-givewell-open-philanthropy-project/ for the complementary post on the GiveWell blog
2017 Report on Consciousness and Moral Patienthood2017-06-06Luke Muehlhauser Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Dyrevernalliansen Albert Schweitzer Foundation for Our Contemporaries Eurogroup for Animals Reasoning supplementMoral patienthood/animal welfareThe writeup announced at https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/new-report-consciousness-and-moral-patienthood provides an overview of the findings of Luke Muehlhauser on moral patienthood -- a broad subject covering what creatures are the subject of moral concern. As described at https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/radical-empathy Open Phil identifies with radical empathy, extending concern to beings considered of moral concern, even if they are not traditionally subjects of empathy and concern. See https://www.facebook.com/groups/effective.altruists/permalink/1426329927423360/ for a discussion of the post on the Effective Altruism Facebook group, and see http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1c3/hi_im_luke_muehlhauser_ama_about_open/ for a related AMA. The writeup influenced the Open Philanthropy Project Farm Animal Welfare Officer Lewis Bollard to investigate and donate in the domain of fish welfare; see http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1c3/hi_im_luke_muehlhauser_ama_about_open/b8o for a comment clarifying this effect
Why Are the US Corporate Cage-Free Campaigns Succeeding?2017-04-11Lewis Bollard Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project The Humane League Mercy For Animals The Humane Society of the United States Compassion in World Farming USA Review of current state of cause areaAnimal welfare/factory farming/cage-free campaignLewis Bollard, Open Philanthropy Project Program Officer for Animal Welfare, who brought passion about cage-free campaigns to the organization when he joined, provides a timeline of cage-free campaigns and an assessment of the success of these campaigns, and the role of the Open Philanthropy Project as a funder
Criminal Justice Reform Strategy2017-03-27Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCriminal justice reformExplanation of the criminal justice reform strategy of the Open Philanthropy Project in the United States, under the leadership of Chloe Cockburn. Discusses broad goals, types of organizations funded, other funders in the space, and expected impact. Announced in email https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/_aKeLKRqtQY by Devin Jacob on 2017-03-27
Our Progress in 2016 and Plans for 20172017-03-14Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyScientific research|AI safetyThe blog post compares progress made by the Open Philanthropy Project in 2016 against plans laid out in https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/our-progress-2015-and-plans-2016 and then lays out plans for 2017. The post notes success in scaling up grantmaking, as hoped for in last year's plan. The spinoff from GiveWell is still not completed because it turned out to be more complex than expected, but it is expected to be finished in mid-2017. Open Phil highlights the hiring of three Scientific Advisors (Chris Somerville, Heather Youngs, and Daniel Martin-Alarcon) in mid-2016, as part of its scientific research work. The organization also plans to focus more on figuring out how to decide how much money to allocate between different cause areas, with Karnofsky's worldview diversification post https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/worldview-diversification also highlighted. There is no plan to scale up staff or grantmmaking (unlike 2016, when the focus was to scale up hiring, and 2015, when the focus was to scale up staff)
A conversation with Lewis Bollard, February 23, 20172017-02-23Lewis Bollard Luke Muehlhauser Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaAnimal welfareFarm animal welfare program officer Lewis Bollard speaks with Luke Muehlhauser, investigator into moral patienthood, on the history of the animal rights and welfare movements as well as recent developments
Good Ventures and Giving Now vs. Later (2016 Update)2016-12-28Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectGood Ventures/GiveWell top and standout charities GiveWell top charities Against Malaria Foundation Schistosomiasis Control Initiative Deworm the World Initiative GiveDirectly Malaria Consortium Sightsavers END Fund Development Media International Food Fortification Initiative Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition Iodine Global Network Living Goods Project Healthy Children Reasoning supplementGlobal health and developmentExplanation of reasoning that led to $50 million allocation to GiveWell top charities
Suggestions for Individual Donors from Open Philanthropy Project Staff - 20162016-12-14Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectJaime Yassif Chloe Cockburn Lewis Bollard Daniel Dewey Nick Beckstead Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense Alliance for Safety and Justice Cosecha Animal Charity Evaluators Compassion in World Farming USA Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute 80,000 Hours Ploughshares Fund Donation suggestion listAnimal welfare|AI safety|Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness|Effective altruism|Migration policyOpen Philanthropy Project staff describe suggestions for best donation opportunities for individual donors in their specific areas
Worldview Diversification2016-12-13Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCause prioritizationThe blog post discusses the challenge of comparing donation opportunities in very different cause areas, and the importance of relying on a diversity of worldviews to inform grantmaking strategy
The Open Philanthropy Project just announced our latest grant to WildAid in China2016-10-25Lewis Bollard Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Green Monday World Animal Protection Brighter Green WildAid Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare/factory farming/ChinaAnnouncement of strategy on Facebook; official document https://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/us-policy/farm-animal-welfare/grants-support-farm-animal-welfare-work-china announced at https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/ngrjni1iKLg (2017-08-09).
Brian Tomasik, Research Lead, Foundational Research Institute on October 6, 20162016-10-06Brian Tomasik Luke Muehlhauser Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Reasoning supplementMoral patienthood/animal welfareConversation as part of research by Muehlhauser into moral patienthood, that would culminate in the writeup https://www.openphilanthropy.org/2017-report-consciousness-and-moral-patienthood published in 2017
Machine Intelligence Research Institute — General Support2016-09-06Open Philanthropy Project Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Machine Intelligence Research Institute Evaluator review of doneeAI safetyOpen Phil writes about the grant at considerable length, more than it usually does. This is because it says that it has found the investigation difficult and believes that others may benefit from its process. The writeup also links to reviews of MIRI research by AI researchers, commissioned by Open Phil: http://files.openphilanthropy.org/files/Grants/MIRI/consolidated_public_reviews.pdf (the reviews are anonymized). The date is based on the announcement date of the grant, see https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/XkSl27jBDZ8 for the email
Anonymized Reviews of Three Recent Papers from MIRI’s Agent Foundations Research Agenda (PDF)2016-09-06Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Machine Intelligence Research Institute Evaluator review of doneeAI safetyReviews of the technical work done by MIRI, solicited and compiled by the Open Philanthropy Project as part of its decision process behind a grant for general support to MIRI documented at http://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/global-catastrophic-risks/potential-risks-advanced-artificial-intelligence/machine-intelligence-research-institute-general-support (grant made 2016-08, announced 2016-09-06)
Housing and Incarceration Memorandum2016-08-22Chelsea Tabart Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Reasoning supplementCriminal justice reformAn internal memorandum on the intersection between housing and incarceration written by Chelsea Tabart for Chloe Cockburn (the criminal justice program officer). The memorandum would be publicly announced and linked to from https://groups.google.com/a/openphilanthropy.org/forum/#!topic/newly.published/jQyJCLBgenc (2017-10-25)
Potential Risks from Advanced Artificial Intelligence: The Philanthropic Opportunity2016-05-06Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute Review of current state of cause areaAI safetyIn this blog post that that the author says took him over over 70 hours to write (See https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/update-how-were-thinking-about-openness-and-information-sharing for the statistic), Holden Karnofsky explains the position of the Open Philanthropy Project on the potential risks and opportunities from AI, and why they are making funding in the area a priority
Our Progress in 2015 and Plans for 20162016-04-29Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyScientific research|AI safetyThe blog post compares progress made by the Open Philanthropy Project in 2015 against plans laid out in https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/open-philanthropy-project-progress-2014-and-plans-2015 and then lays out plans for 2016. The post notes the following in relation to its 2015 plans: it succeeded in hiring and expanding the team, but had to scale back on its scientific research ambitions in mid-2015. For 2016, Open Phil plans to focus on scaling up its grantmaking and reducing its focus on hiring. AI safety is declared as an intended priority for 2016, with Daniel Dewey working on it full-time, and Nick Beckstead and Holden Karnofsky also devoting significant time to it. The post also notes plans to continue work on separating the Open Philanthropy Project from GiveWell
Initial Grants to Support Corporate Cage-free Reforms2016-03-31Lewis Bollard Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project The Humane League Mercy For Animals The Humane Society of the United States Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare/factory farming/chicken/cage-free campaign/internationalWritten to explain a bunch of grants already made in 2016-02 to support cage-free reforms in the United States for egg-laying chicken. The blog post had a heated comment section, potentially influencing future Open Phil communication on the subject
Suggestions for individual donors from Open Philanthropy Project staff2015-12-23Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectChloe Cockburn Lewis Bollard Alexander Berger Nick Beckstead Howie Lempel Alliance for Safety and Justice Bronx Freedom Fund The Humane League The Humane Society of the United States Center for Global Development Center for Popular Democracy Ploughshares Fund Donation suggestion listCriminal justice reform|Animal welfare|Global healthOpen Philanthropy Project staff describe suggestions for best donation opportunities for individual donors in their specific areas. The post was originally published to the GiveWell blog
My Cause Selection: Michael Dickens2015-09-15Michael Dickens Effective Altruism ForumMichael Dickens Machine Intelligence Research Institute Future of Humanity Institute Centre for the Study of Existential Risk Future of Life Institute Open Philanthropy Project Animal Charity Evaluators Animal Ethics Foundational Research Institute Giving What We Can Charity Science Raising for Effective Giving Single donation documentationAnimal welfare,AI risk,Effective altruismExplanation by Dickens of giving choice for 2015. After some consideration, narrows choice to three orgs: MIRI, ACE, and REG. Finally chooses REG due to weighted donation multiplier
Incoming Program Officer: Lewis Bollard2015-09-11Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyAnimal welfareOpen Philanthropy Project announces that it is hiring Lewis Bollard, poaching him from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) via a referral from Howie Lempel. Bollard would direct tens of millions of dollars in funding in the area over the next few years, including massive spend on corporate cage-free campaigns in the United States and internationally. The post was originally published on the GiveWell blog at https://blog.givewell.org/2015/09/11/incoming-program-officer-lewis-bollard/ and has 6 comments there
Incoming Program Officer for Criminal Justice Reform: Chloe Cockburn2015-06-16Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCriminal justice reformThe post notes that the Open Philanthropy Project is hiring Chloe Cockburn as the Program Officer in criminal justice reform, poaching her from the American Civil Liberties Union. Cockburn would direct tens of millions of dollars in funding in criminal justice reform over the next few years. The post was originally published on the GiveWell blog at https://blog.givewell.org/2015/06/16/incoming-program-officer-for-criminal-justice-reform-chloe-cockburn/ and has 5 comemnts there
Open Philanthropy Project: Progress in 2014 and Plans for 20152015-03-12Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyGlobal catastrophic risks|Scientific research|Global health and developmentThe blog post compares progress made by the Open Philanthropy Project in 2015 against plans laid out in https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/givewell-labs-progress-2013-and-plans-2014 and lays out further plans for 2015. The post says that progress in the areas of U.S. policy and global catastrophic risks was substantial and matched expectations, but progress in scientific research and global health and development was less than hoped for. The plan for 2015 is to focus on growing more in the domain of scientific research and postpone work on global health and development (thus freeing up staff capacity). There is much more detail in the post
Open Philanthropy Project Update: U.S. Policy2015-03-10Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCause prioritization,Criminal justice reform,Animal welfare,Macroeconomic stabilization policy,Migration policy,Drug policyOriginally published on the GiveWell blog at https://blog.givewell.org/2015/03/10/open-philanthropy-project-update-u-s-policy/ where comments can still be found. This is an annual update on where the Open Philanthropy Project stands on its investigation of United States policy issues. Some of the cause areas covered under what they call United States policy would later include grants to outside the United States (in particular, animal welfare), while others, such as criminal justice reform and macroeconomic stabilization policy, would remain within the United States
Thoughts on the Sandler Foundation2015-02-24Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectSandler Foundation Open Philanthropy Project Center for American Progress ProPublica Center for Responsible Lending Washington Center for Equitable Growth Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Third-party coverage of donor strategyThis blog post originally appeared on the GiveWell blog at https://blog.givewell.org/2015/02/24/thoughts-on-the-sandler-foundation/ prior to the Open Phil blog launch. The post is part of Open Phil research into how different foundations structure their operations and giving. The post covers the Sandler Foundation, which has an unusual giving model, sacrificing cause-specific, domain-expert "program officers" and instead having a small staff that would opportunistically shift between researching different giving opportunities. Successes of the Sandler Foundation were noted, including forming the Center for American Progress, ProPublica, Center for Responsible Lending, and Washington Center for Equitable Growth, and providing support to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The Sandler Foundation approach was described as follows: (1) The priority placed on funding strong leadership, (2) A high level of “opportunism”: being ready to put major funding or no funding behind an idea, depending on the quality of the specific opportunity. Ultimately, the post concluded that Open Phil would probably stick with the more standard program officer model and including a mix of larger and smaller grants. Reasons given were: (a) Open Phil's policy priorities mapped less clearly to existing political platforms than the Sandler Foundation's, so it would be harder to find fully aligned leaders, (b) Open Phil sees a good deal of value in relatively small, low-confidence, low-due-diligence grants that give a person/team a chance to “get an idea off the ground.” We’ve made multiple such grants to date and we plan on continuing to do so, (c) confidence in the Sandler Foundation's track record was not very high. However, Open Phil might experiment with using generalist staff in addition to program officers; the generalists would scan across issues to find and vet opportunities
Criminal justice reform2014-11-01Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaCriminal justice reformThe document gives the state of understanding of the Open Philanthropy Project as of November 2014, of the landscrape for criminal justice reform in the United States. It was originally prepared for a November 2014 convening. It is superseded by later documents, in particular https://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/us-policy/criminal-justice-reform/criminal-justice-reform-strategy (2017-03-27)
Potential Global Catastrophic Risk Focus Areas2014-06-26Alexander Berger Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyAI safety|Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness|Global catastrophic risksIn this blog post originally published at https://blog.givewell.org/2014/06/26/potential-global-catastrophic-risk-focus-areas/ Alexander Berger goes over a list of seven types of global catastrophic risks (GCRs) that the Open Philanthropy Project has considered. He details three promising areas that the Open Philanthropy Project is exploring more and may make grants in: (1) Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness, (2) Geoengineering research and governance, (3) AI safety. For the AI safety section, there is a note from Executive Director Holden Karnofsky saying that he sees AI safety as a more promising area than Berger does
Potential U.S. Policy Focus Areas2014-05-29Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCause prioritization|Criminal justice reform|Drug policy|Migration policy|Macroeconomic stabilization policy|Global health and development|Climate change|Tax policyThe blog post reviews the current understanding of the Open Philanthropy Project of various cause areas that they are considering for their grantmaking. They break up the cause areas discussed as: Windows of opportunity: outstanding tractability (i.e., "the time is right"), Ambitious longshots: outstanding importance, and Green fields: outstanding "room for more philanthropy". Other causes of interest (that do not neatly fit into one of these boxes) are also discussed
Criminal Justice Reform2014-05-01Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaCriminal justice reformThe document summarizes the state of investigation of the Open Philanthropy Project into criminal justice reform in a United States context, as of May 2014. The nutshell headers are: What is the state of our investigation into U.S. criminal justice reform? Why are we making criminal justice reform grants? What is the problem? What are possible interventions?
Macroeconomic policy2014-05-01Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaMacroeconomic stabilization policyInitial findings from a medium-depth investigation into the current state of macroeconomic stabilization policy
GiveWell Labs - Progress in 2013 and Plans for 20142014-03-05Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Broad donor strategyCause prioritizationOriginally published on the GiveWell blog at https://blog.givewell.org/2014/03/05/givewell-labs-progress-in-2013-and-plans-for-2014/ where comments can still be found. This is an annual update on the state of the Open Philanthropy Project, which, at the time, was called GiveWell Labs. It describes the areas that the Open Philanthropy Project plans to focus on, and the level of depth it plans to go into
Biosecurity2014-01-01Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaBiosecurity and pandemic preparednessInitial findings from a shallow investigation into the current state of biosecurity and its funding
Treatment of Animals in Industrial Agriculture2013-09-01Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaAnimal welfare/factory farming/United StatesInitial findings from a shallow investigation into the impact of industrial agriculture on animal welfare in the United States
Migration policy/international labor mobility2013-05-01Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaMigration policy/international labor mobilityInitial findings from a shallow investigation into the current state of labor mobility, with more focus on the United States
Advocacy for Improved or Increased U.S. Foreign AidOpen Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Review of current state of cause areaGlobal health and developmentThe Open Philanthropy Project reviews the current state of policy advocacy for increasing development assistance from the United States government, in order to identify what a new funder (potentially, the Open Philanthropy Project) could do in the space

Full list of donations in reverse chronological order (0 donations)

DonorAmount (current USD)Amount rank (out of 0)Donation dateCause areaURLInfluencerNotes