Effective Altruism Funds donations made (filtered to cause areas matching Rationality improvement)

This is an online portal with information on donations that were announced publicly (or have been shared with permission) that were of interest to Vipul Naik. The git repository with the code for this portal, as well as all the underlying data, is available on GitHub. All payment amounts are in current United States dollars (USD). The repository of donations is being seeded with an initial collation by Issa Rice as well as continued contributions from him (see his commits and the contract work page listing all financially compensated contributions to the site) but all responsibility for errors and inaccuracies belongs to Vipul Naik. Current data is preliminary and has not been completely vetted and normalized; if sharing a link to this site or any page on this site, please include the caveat that the data is preliminary (if you want to share without including caveats, please check with Vipul Naik). We expect to have completed the first round of development by the end of December 2019. See the about page for more details. Also of interest: pageview data on analytics.vipulnaik.com, tutorial in README, request for feedback to EA Forum.

Table of contents

Basic donor information

ItemValue
Country United Kingdom
Affiliated organizations (current or former; restricted to potential donees or others relevant to donation decisions)Centre for Effective Altruism
Websitehttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/
Donations URLhttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/
Regularity with which donor updates donations datairregular
Regularity with which Donations List Website updates donations data (after donor update)irregular
Lag with which donor updates donations datamonths
Lag with which Donations List Website updates donations data (after donor update)days
Data entry method on Donations List WebsiteManual (no scripts used)

Brief history: The funds are a program of the Centre for Effective Altruism (CEA). The creation of the funds was inspired by the success of the EA Giving Group donor-advised fund run by Nick Beckstead, and also by the donor lottery run in December 2016 by Paul Christiano and Carl Shulman (see http://effective-altruism.com/ea/14d/donor_lotteries_demonstration_and_faq/ for more). EA Funds were introduced on 2017-02-09 in the post http://effective-altruism.com/ea/174/introducing_the_ea_funds/ and launched on 2017-02-28 in the post http://effective-altruism.com/ea/17v/ea_funds_beta_launch/ The first round of allocations was announced on 2017-04-20 at http://effective-altruism.com/ea/19d/update_on_effective_altruism_funds/ The funds allocation information appears to have next been updated in November 2017; see https://www.facebook.com/groups/effective.altruists/permalink/1606722932717391/ for more

Brief notes on broad donor philosophy and major focus areas: There are four EA Funds, each with its own focus area and own fund managers: Global Health and Development (Elie Hassenfeld of GiveWell), Animal Welfare (Lewis Bollard of the Open Philanthropy Project as Chair, Toni Adleberg of Animal Charity Evaluators, Natalie Cargill of Effective Giving, and Jamie Spurgeon of Animal Charity Evaluators), Long Term Future (Matt Fallshaw as Chair, Oliver Habryka, Helen Toner, Matt Wage, and Alex Zhu; Nick Beckstead and Jonas Vollmer serve as advisors), and EA Community (also known as EA Meta) (Luke Ding as Chair, Alex Foster, Tara Mac Aulay, Denise Melchin, and Matt Wage; Nick Beckstead serves as advisor)

Notes on grant decision logistics: Grants are decided separately within each of the four funds, by the managers of that fund. Allocation of the money may take about a month after the grant decision. Fund managers generally allocate multiple grants together with a bunch of money collected over the last few months. For all funds except the Global Health and Development Fund, the target months for making grant decisions are November, February, and June. For the Global Health and Development Fund, the target months are December, March and July. Actual grant decision months may be one or two months later than the target months

Notes on grant publication logistics: Grant details are published on the EA Funds website, and linked to from the page on the specific Fund. Grants allocated together are generally published together on a single page. Grants from the Global Health and Development Fund (managed by Elie Hassenfeld of GiveWell) are usually of two types: (1) Grants that are also GiveWell Incubation Grants, so they will be cross-posted to the GiveWell Incubation Grants page on GiveWell's site (but are listed only with donor Effective Altruism Funds on the donations list website), (2) Grants that are decided along with and similarly to GiveWell discretionary regranting

Notes on grant financing: Finances for each of the funds are maintained separately: individual donors can donate to a specific fund, or to all funds in a specific proportion specified by them. Only money explicitly donated to a fund can be granted out from that fund. Other money of the Centre for Effective Altruism (CEA) is not granted out through the Funds

This entity is also a donee.

Donor donation statistics

Cause areaCountMedianMeanMinimum10th percentile 20th percentile 30th percentile 40th percentile 50th percentile 60th percentile 70th percentile 80th percentile 90th percentile Maximum
Overall 4 30,000 95,505 28,000 28,000 28,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 150,000 150,000 174,021 174,021 174,021
Rationality improvement 4 30,000 95,505 28,000 28,000 28,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 150,000 150,000 174,021 174,021 174,021

Donation amounts by cause area and year

If you hover over a cell for a given cause area and year, you will get a tooltip with the number of donees and the number of donations.

Note: Cause area classification used here may not match that used by donor for all cases.

Cause area Number of donations Number of donees Total 2019 2018
Rationality improvement (filter this donor) 4 3 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00
Total 4 3 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00

Graph of spending by cause area and year (incremental, not cumulative)

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Graph of spending by cause area and year (cumulative)

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Donation amounts by subcause area and year

If you hover over a cell for a given subcause area and year, you will get a tooltip with the number of donees and the number of donations.

For the meaning of “classified” and “unclassified”, see the page clarifying this.

Subcause area Number of donations Number of donees Total 2019 2018
Rationality improvement 4 3 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00
Classified total 4 3 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00
Unclassified total 0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 4 3 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00

Graph of spending by subcause area and year (incremental, not cumulative)

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Graph of spending by subcause area and year (cumulative)

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Donation amounts by donee and year

Donee Cause area Metadata Total 2019 2018
Center for Applied Rationality (filter this donor) Rationality FB Tw WP Site TW 324,021.00 150,000.00 174,021.00
Eli Tyre (filter this donor) 30,000.00 30,000.00 0.00
Effective Altruism Russia (filter this donor) 28,000.00 28,000.00 0.00
Total -- -- 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00

Graph of spending by donee and year (incremental, not cumulative)

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Graph of spending by donee and year (cumulative)

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Donation amounts by influencer and year

If you hover over a cell for a given influencer and year, you will get a tooltip with the number of donees and the number of donations.

For the meaning of “classified” and “unclassified”, see the page clarifying this.

Influencer Number of donations Number of donees Total 2019 2018
Oliver Habryka|Alex Zhu|Matt Wage|Helen Toner|Matt Fallshaw 3 3 208,000.00 208,000.00 0.00
Nick Beckstead 1 1 174,021.00 0.00 174,021.00
Classified total 4 3 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00
Unclassified total 0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 4 3 382,021.00 208,000.00 174,021.00

Graph of spending by influencer and year (incremental, not cumulative)

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Graph of spending by influencer and year (cumulative)

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Donation amounts by disclosures and year

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Donation amounts by country and year

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Full list of documents in reverse chronological order (25 documents)

Title (URL linked)Publication dateAuthorPublisherAffected donorsAffected doneesDocument scopeCause areaNotes
Long Term Future Fund and EA Meta Fund applications open until June 28th2019-06-10Oliver Habryka Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Request for proposalsAI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismThe blog post announces that two of the funds under Effective Altruism Funds, namely the Long Term Future Fund and the EA Meta Fund, are open for rolling applications. The application window for the current rund ends on June 28. Response time windows will be 3-4 months (i.e., after the end of the corresponding application cycle). In rare cases, grants may be made out-of-cycle. Grant amounts must be at least $10,000, and will generally be under $100,000. The blog post gives guidelines on the kinds of applications that each fund will accept
80,000 Hours Annual Review – December 20182019-05-07Benjamin Todd 80,000 HoursOpen Philanthropy Project Berkeley Existential Risk Initiative Effective Altruism Funds 80,0000 Hours Donee periodic updateEffective altruism/movement growth/career counselingThis blog post is the annual self-review by 80,000 Hours, originally written in December 2018. Publication was deferred because 80,000 Hours was waiting to hear back on the status of some large grants (in particular, one from the Open Philanthropy Project), but most of the content is still from the December 2018 draft. The post goes into detail about 80,000 Hours' progress in 2018, impact and plan changes, and future expansion plans. Funding gaps are discussed (the funding gap for 2019 is $400,000, and further money will be saved for 2020 and 2021). Grants from the Open Philanthropy Project, BERI, and the Effective Altruism Funds (EA Meta Fund) are mentioned
Thoughts on the EA Hotel2019-04-25Oliver Habryka Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds EA Hotel Evaluator review of doneeEffective altruism/housingWith permission from Greg Colbourn of the EA Hotel, Habryka publicly posts the feedback he sent to the EA Hotel, who was rejected from the April 2019 funding round by the Long Term Future Fund. Habryka first lists three reasons he is excited about the Hotel: (a) Providing a safety net, (b) Acting on historical interest, (c) Building high-dedication cultures. He articulates three concrete models of concerns: (1) Initial overeagerness to publicize the EA Hotel (a point he now believes is mostly false, based on Greg Colbourn's response), (2) Significant chance of the EA Hotel culture becoming actively harmful for residents, (3) No good candidate to take charge of long-term logistics of running the hotel. Habryka concludes by saying he thinks all his concerns can be overcome. At the moment, he thinks the hotel should be funded for the next year, but is unsure of whether they should be given money to buy the hotel next door. The comment replies include one by Greg Colbourn, giving his backstory on the media attention (re: (1)) and discussing the situation with (2) and (3). There are also other replies, including one from casebash, who stayed at the hotel for a significant time
This is the most substantial round of grant recommendations from the EA Long-Term Future Fund to date, so it is a good opportunity to evaluate the performance of the Fund after changes to its management structure in the last year2019-04-17Evan Gaensbauer Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Third-party coverage of donor strategyGlobal catastrophic risks/AI safety/far futureEvan Gaensbauer reviews the grantmaking of the Long Term Future Fund since the management structure change in 2018 (with Nick Beckstead leaving). He uses the jargon "counterfactually unique" for grant recommendations that, without the Long-Term Future Fund, individual donors nor larger grantmakers like the Open Philanthropy Project would have identified or funded. Based on that measure, he calculates that 20 of 23, or 87%, grant recommendations, worth $673,150 of $923,150, or ~73% of the money to be disbursed, are counterfactually unique. After excluding the grants that people have expressed serious concerns about in the comments, he says: "16 of 23, or 69.5%, of grants, worth $535,150 of $923,150, or ~58%, of the money to be disbursed, are counterfactually unique and fit into a more conservative, risk-averse approach that would have ruled out more uncertain or controversial successful grant applicants." He calls these numbers "an extremely significant improvement in the quality and quantity of unique opportunities for grantmaking the Long-Term Future Fund has made since a year ago." and considers the grants and the grant report an overall success. In a reply comment, Milan Griffes thanks him for the comment, which he calls an "audit"
You received almost 100 applications as far as I'm aware, but were able to fund only 23 of them. Some other projects were promising according to you, but you didn't have time to vet them all. What other reasons did you have for rejecting applications?2019-04-08Risto Uuk Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Third-party coverage of donor strategyThe question by Risto Uuk is answered by Oliver Habryka giving the typical factors that might cause the Long Term Future Fund to reject an application. Of the factors listed, one that generates a lot of discussion is when the fund managers have no way of assessing the applicant without investing significant amounts of time, beyond what they have available. This is considered concerning because it creates a bias toward grantees who are better networked and known to the funders. The need for grant amounts that are big enough to justify the overhead costs leads to further discussion of the overhead costs of the marginal and average grant. Conversation participants include Oliver Habryka, Peter Hurford, Ben Kuhn, Michelle Hutchinson, Jonas Vollmer, John Maxwell IV, Jess Whittlestone, Milan Griffes, Evan Gaensbauer, and others
Major Donation: Long Term Future Fund Application Extended 1 Week2019-02-16Oliver Habryka Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Request for proposalsAI safety|Global catastrophic risksThe blog post announces that the EA Long-Term Future Fund has received a large donation, which doubles the amount of money available for granting to ~$1.2 million. It extends the deadline for applications at at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeDTbCDbnIN11vcgHM3DKq6M0cZ3itAy5GIPK17uvTXcz8ZFA/viewform?usp=sf_link by 1 week, to 2019-02-24 midnight PST. The application form was previously annonced at https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/oFeGLaJ5bZBBRbjC9/ea-funds-long-term-future-fund-is-open-to-applications-until and supposed to be open till 2019-02-07 for the February 2019 round of grants. Cross-posted to LessWrong at https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/ZKsSuxHWNGiXJBJ9Z/major-donation-long-term-future-fund-application-extended-1
My 2018 donations2019-01-20Ben Kuhn Ben Kuhn Effective Altruism Funds Ben Kuhn donor-advised fund GiveWell GiveWell top charities Ben Kuhn donor-advised fund Effective Altruism Funds Periodic donation list documentationGlobal health and developmentKuhn describes his decision to allocate his donation amount ($70,000, calculated as 50% of his income for the year) between GiveWell, GiveWell top charities, and his own donor-advised fund managed by Fidelity. Kuhn also discusses how he has been out of the loop of the latest developments in effective altruism, which is part of the reason his grants for this year are so boring. However, he is happy with recent management changes and increased grantmaking activity from the Effective Altruism Funds, and they are currently his default choice of where to allocate money from his donor-advised fund in 2019, if he does not find a better donation target. Kuhn also discusses some logistical aspects of his donation, such as: need to make some of his 2018 donations in 2019 and use of the donor-advised fund to channel his donation to GiveWell
EA Funds: Long-Term Future fund is open to applications until Feb. 7th2019-01-17Oliver Habryka Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Request for proposalsAI safety|Global catastrophic risksCross-posted to LessWrong at https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/dvGE8JSeFHtmHC6Gb/ea-funds-long-term-future-fund-is-open-to-applications-until The post seeks proposals for the Long-Term Future Fund. Proposals must be submitted by 2019-02-07 at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeDTbCDbnIN11vcgHM3DKq6M0cZ3itAy5GIPK17uvTXcz8ZFA/viewform?usp=sf_link to be considered for the round of grants being announced mid-February. From the application, excerpted in the post: "We are particularly interested in small teams and individuals that are trying to get projects off the ground, or that need less money than existing grant-making institutions are likely to give out (i.e. less than ~$100k, but more than $10k). Here are a few examples of project types that we're open to funding an individual or group for (note that this list is not exhaustive)"
EA Meta Fund: we are open to applications2019-01-05Denise Melchin Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Request for proposalsEffective altruismThe post announces the existence of a form at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeID5kjD9zsvlwgqB3hlX54EINg6_pY6sYl4hm7s-bYuDGiwA/viewform through which one can apply for consideration for receiving a grant from the EA Meta Fund. Submissions made by midnight GMT on January 20 will be considered for the grant distribution to be announced in mid-February, but applications made after this date will be considered for future rounds
EA Meta Fund AMA: 20th Dec 20182018-12-19Alex Foster Denise Melchin Matt Wage Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Donee AMAEffective altruismThe post is an Ask Me Anything (AMA) for the Effective Altruism Meta Fund. The questions and answers are in the post comments. Questions are asked by a number of people including alexherwix, Luke Muehlhauser, Tee Barnett,and Peter Hurford. Answers are provided by Denise Melchin, Matt Wage, and Alex Foster, three of the five people managing the fund. The other two, Luke Ding and Tara MacAulay, do not post any comment replies, but are referenced in some of the replies. The questions include how the meta fund sees its role, how much time they expect to spend allocating grants, what sort of criteria they use for evaluating opportunities, and what data inform their decisions
Animal Welfare Fund AMA2018-12-19Jamie Spurgeon Lewis Bollard Natalie Cargill Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Donee AMAAnimal welfareThe post is an Ask Me Anything (AMA) for the Animal Welfare Fund. The questions and answers are in the post comments. Questions are asked by a number of people including Tee Barnett, Peter Hurford, Halstead, Josh You, and Kevin Watkinson. Answers are provided by Lewis Bollard, Jamie Spurgeon, and Natalie Cargill, three of the four managers of the fund. The fourth manager, Toni Adleberg, does not particulate directly, but is referenced in the other answers. Questions cover the risks of lack of diversity due to dominance by Open Philanthropy Project and Animal Charity Evaluators, learning plans from the seemingly "hits-based giving" approach, the relation with the Effective Animal Advocacy Fund managed by ACE, the amount of time spent evaluating grants, criteria for evaluating grants, and research that would help the team.
Long-Term Future Fund AMA2018-12-18Helen Toner Oliver Habryka Alex Zhu Matt Fallshaw Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Donee AMAAI safety|Global catastrophic risksThe post is an Ask Me Anything (AMA) for the Long-Term Future Find. The question and answers are in the post comments. Questions are asked by a number of people including Luke Muehlhauser, Josh You, Peter Hurford, Alex Foster, and Robert Jones. Fund managers Oliver Habryka, Matt Fallshaw, Helen Toner, and Alex Zhu respond in the comments. Fund manager Matt Wage does not appear to have participated. Questions cover the amount of time spent evaluating grants, the evaluation criteria, the methods of soliciting grants, and research that would help the team
EA Funds: Long-Term Future fund is open to applications until November 24th (this Saturday)2018-11-20Oliver Habryka Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Request for proposalsAI safety|Global catastrophic risksThe post seeks proposals for the CEA Long-Term Future Fund. Proposals must be submitted by 2018-11-24 at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf46ZTOIlv6puMxkEGm6G1FADe5w5fCO3ro-RK6xFJWt7SfaQ/viewform in order to be considered for the round of grants to be announced by the end of November 2018
Announcing new EA Funds management teams2018-10-27Marek Duda Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismThe post announces the transition of the Effective Altruism Funds manaagement to teams, with a chair, team members, and advisors. The EA Community Fund is renamed the EA Meta Fund, and has chair Luke Ding and team Denise Melchin, Matt Wage, Alex Foster, and Tara MacAulay, with advisor Nick Beckstead. The long-term future fund has chair Matt Fallshaw, and team Helen Toner, Oliver Habryka, Matt Wage, and Alex Zhu, with advisors Nick Beckstead and Jonas Vollmer. The animal welfare fund has chair Lewis Bollard (same as before) and team Jamie Spurgeon, Natalie Cargill, and Toni Adleberg. The global development fund continues to be solely managed by Elie Hassenfeld. The granting schedule will be thrice a year: November, February, and June for all funds except the Global Development Fund, which will be in December, March, and July.
EA Funds - An update from CEA2018-08-07Marek Duda Centre for Effective AltruismEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismMarek Duda gives an update on work on the EA Funds donation platform, the departure of Nick Beckstead from managing the EA Community and Long-Term Future Funds, and the experimental creation of "Junior" Funds
The EA Community and Long-Term Future Funds Lack Transparency and Accountability2018-07-23Evan Gaensbauer Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Evaluator review of doneeAnimal welfare|global health|AI safety|global catastrophic risks|effective altruismEvan Gaensbauer builds on past criticism of the EA Funds by Henry Stanley at http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1k9/ea_funds_hands_out_money_very_infrequently_should/ and http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1mr/how_to_improve_ea_funds/ Gaensbauer notes that the Global Health and Development Fund and the Animal Welfare Fund have done a better job of paying out and announcing payouts. However, the Long-Term Future Fund and EA Community Fund, both managed by Nick Beckstead, have announced only one payout, and have missed their self-imposed date for announcing the remaining payouts. Some comments by Marek Duda of the Centre for Effective Altruism (the parent of EA Funds) are also discussed
Update on Partnerships with External Donors2018-05-16Holden Karnofsky Open Philanthropy ProjectOpen Philanthropy Project Future Justice Fund Accountable Justice Action Fund Effective Altruism Funds Accountable Justice Action Fund Effective Altruism Funds Miscellaneous commentaryCriminal justice reform,Animal welfareThe Open Philanthropy Project describes how it works with donors other than Good Ventures (the foundation under Dustin Moskovitz and Cari Tuna that accounts for almost all Open Phil grantmaking). The blog post reiterates that the long-term goal is to inform many different funders, but that is not a short-term priority because the Open Philanthropy Project is not moving enough money to even achieve the total spend that Good Ventures is willing to go up to. The post mentions that Chloe Cockburn, the program officer for criminal justice reform, is working with other funders in criminal justice reform, and they have created a separate vehicle, the Accountable Justice Action Fund, to pool resources. Also, Mike and Kaitlyn Krieger, who previously worked with the Open Philanthropy Project, now have their own criminal justice-focused Future Justice Fund, and are getting help from Cockburn to allocate money from the fund. For causes outside of criminal justice reform, the role of Effective Altruism Funds (whose grantmaking is managed by Open Philanthropy Project staff members) is mentioned. Also, Lewis Bollard is said to have moved ~10% as much money through advice to other donors as he has moved through the Open Philanthropy Project
How to improve EA Funds2018-04-04Henry Stanley Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Evaluator review of doneeAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismHenry Stanley echoes thoughts expressed in his previous post http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1k9/ea_funds_hands_out_money_very_infrequently_should/ and argues for regular disbursement, holding funds in interest-bearing assets, and more clarity about fund manager bandwidth. Comments also discuss Effective Altruism Grants
Where, why and how I donated in 20172018-02-01Ben Kuhn Ben Kuhn Open Philanthropy Project Effective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Grants GiveWell GiveWell top charities EA Giving Group Effective Altruism Funds Periodic donation list documentationGlobal health and developmentKuhn describes his decision to allocate his donation amount ($60,000, calculated as 50% of his income for the year) between GiveWell, GiveWell top charities, and his own donor-advised fund managed by Fidelity. Kuhn also discusses the Open Philanthropy Project, EA Funds, and EA Grants, and the EA Giving Group he donated to the previous year
EA Funds hands out money very infrequently - should we be worried?2018-01-31Henry Stanley Effective Altruism ForumEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Miscellaneous commentaryAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismHenry Stanley expresses concern that the Effective Altruism Funds hands out money very infrequently. Commenters include Peter Hurford (who suggests a percentage-based approach), Elie Hassenfeld, the manager of the global health and development fund, and Evan Gaensbauer, a person well-connected in effective altruist social circles
What is the status of EA funds? They seem pretty dormant2017-12-10Ben West Effective Altruism Facebook groupEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Miscellaneous commentaryAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismBen West, wondering whether to donate to the Effective Altruism Funds for his end-of-year donation, wonders whether the Funds are dormant, since no donations from the fund have been announced since April. In the comments, Marek Duda of the Centre for Effective Altruism reports that the Funds pages have been updated to include some recent donations, and West updates his post to note that
Discussion: Adding New Funds to EA Funds2017-06-01Kerry Vaughan Centre for Effective AltruismEffective Altruism Funds Broad donor strategyAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismKerry Vaughan of Effective Altruism Funds discusses the alternatives being considered regarding expanding the number of funds, and asks readers for opinions
Update on Effective Altruism Funds2017-04-20Kerry Vaughan Centre for Effective AltruismEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds Periodic donation list documentationAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismKerry Vaughan provides a progress report on the beta launch of EA Funds, and says it will go on beyond beta. The post includes information on reception of EA Funds so far, money donated to the funds, and fund allocations for the money donated so far
EA Funds Beta Launch2017-02-28Tara MacAulay Centre for Effective AltruismEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds LaunchAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismTara MacAulay of the Centre for Effective Altruism (CEA), the parent of Effective Altruism Funds, describes the beta launch of the project. CEA will revisit within three months to decide whether to make the EA Funds permanent
Introducing the EA Funds2017-02-09William MacAskill Centre for Effective AltruismEffective Altruism Funds Effective Altruism Funds LaunchAnimal welfare|Global health|AI safety|Global catastrophic risks|Effective altruismWilliam MacAskill of the Centre for Effective Altruism (CEA) proposes EA Funds, inspired by the Shulman/Christiano donor lottery from 2016-12, while also incorporating elements of the EA Giving Group run by Nick Beckstead

Full list of donations in reverse chronological order (4 donations)

DoneeAmount (current USD)Amount rank (out of 4)Donation dateCause areaURLInfluencerNotes
Effective Altruism Russia (Earmark: Mikhail Yugadin)28,000.0042019-04-07Rationality improvementhttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/far-future/payouts/6vDsjtUyDdvBa3sNeoNVvlOliver Habryka Alex Zhu Matt Wage Helen Toner Matt Fallshaw Donation process: Donee submitted grant application through the application form for the April 2019 round of grants from the Long Term Future Fund, and was selected as a grant recipient (23 out of almost 100 applications were accepted)

Intended use of funds (category): Direct project expenses

Intended use of funds: Grant to Mikhail Yugadin for Effective Altruism Russia to give copies of Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality to the winners of EGMO 2019 and IMO 2020.

Donor reason for selecting the donee: In the grant write-up, Oliver Habryka explains his evaluation of the grant as based on three questions: (1) What effects does reading HPMOR have on people? (2) How good of a target group are Math Olympiad winners for these effects? (3) Is the team competent enough to execute on their plan?

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): Likely to be the amount requested by the donee in the application (this is not stated explicitly by either the donor or the donee). The comments include more discussion of the unit economics of the grant, and whether the effective cost of $43/copy is reasonable
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 3.03%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by timing of grant round. No specific timing-related considerations are discussed. The need to secure money in advance of the events for which the money will be used likely affected the timing of the application

Other notes: The grant reasoning is written up by Oliver Habryka and is available at https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/CJJDwgyqT4gXktq6g/long-term-future-fund-april-2019-grant-decisions There is a lot of criticism and discussion of the grant in the comments.
Center for Applied Rationality150,000.0022019-04-07Rationality improvementhttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/far-future/payouts/6vDsjtUyDdvBa3sNeoNVvlOliver Habryka Alex Zhu Matt Wage Helen Toner Matt Fallshaw Donation process: Donee submitted grant application through the application form for the April 2019 round of grants from the Long Term Future Fund, and was selected as a grant recipient (23 out of almost 100 applications were accepted)

Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: The grant is to help the Center for Applied Rationality (CFAR) survive as an organization for the next few months (i.e., till the next grant round, which is 3 months later) without having to scale down operations. CFAR is low on finances because they did not run a 2018 fundraiser. because they felt that running a fundraiser would be in bad taste after what they considered a messup on their part in the Brent Dill situation

Donor reason for selecting the donee: Grant investigator and main influencer Oliver Habryka thinks CFAR intro workshops have had positive impact in 3 ways: (1) establishing epistemic norms, (2) training, and (3) recruitment into the X-risk network (especially AI safety). He also thinks CFAR faces many challenges, including the departure of many key employees, the difficulty of attracting top talent, and a dilution of its truth-seeking focus. However, he is enthusiastic about joint CFAR/MIRI workshops for programmers, where CFAR provides instructors. His final reason for donating is to avoid CFAR having to scale down due to its funding shortfall because it didn't run the 2018 fundraiser

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): The grant amount, which is the largest in this grant round from the EA Long Term Future Fund, is chosen to be sufficient for CFAR to continue operating as usual till the next grant round from the EA Long Term Future Fund (in about 3 months). Habryka further elaborates in https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/CJJDwgyqT4gXktq6g/long-term-future-fund-april-2019-grant-recommendations#uhH4ioNbdaFrwGt4e in reply to Milan Griffes, explaining why the grant is large and unrestricted
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 16.25%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by timing of grant round, as well as by CFAR's time-sensitive financial situation; the grant round is a few months after the end of 2018, so the shortfall of funds raised because of not conducting the 2018 fundraiser is starting to hit on the finances
Intended funding timeframe in months: 3

Donor thoughts on making further donations to the donee: Grant investigator and main influencer Oliver Habryka writes: "I didn’t have enough time this grant round to understand how the future of CFAR will play out; the current grant amount seems sufficient to ensure that CFAR does not have to take any drastic action until our next grant round. By the next grant round, I plan to have spent more time learning and thinking about CFAR’s trajectory and future, and to have a more confident opinion about what the correct funding level for CFAR is."

Other notes: The grant reasoning is written up by Oliver Habryka and is available at https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/CJJDwgyqT4gXktq6g/long-term-future-fund-april-2019-grant-decisions In the comments, Milan Griffes asks why such a large, unrestricted grant is being made to CFAR despite these concerns, and also what Habryka hopes to learn about CFAR before the next grant round. There are replies from Peter McCluskey and Habryka, with some further comment back-and-forth.
Eli Tyre30,000.0032019-04-07Rationality improvementhttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/far-future/payouts/6vDsjtUyDdvBa3sNeoNVvlOliver Habryka Alex Zhu Matt Wage Helen Toner Matt Fallshaw Donation process: Donee submitted grant application through the application form for the April 2019 round of grants from the Long Term Future Fund, and was selected as a grant recipient (23 out of almost 100 applications were accepted)

Intended use of funds (category): Direct project expenses

Intended use of funds: Grant to support projects for rationality and community building interventions. Example projects: facilitating conversations between top people in AI alignment, organization advanced workshops on double crux, doing independent research projects such as https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/tj8QP2EFdP8p54z6i/historical-mathematicians-exhibit-a-birth-order-effect-too (evaluating burth order effects in mathematicians), providing new EAs and rationalists with advice and guidance on how to get traction on working on important problems, and helping John Salvatier develop techniques around skill transfer. Grant investigator and main influencer Oliver Habryka writes: "the goal of this grant is to allow [Eli Tyre] to take actions with greater leverage by hiring contractors, paying other community members for services, and paying for other varied expenses associated with his projects."

Donor reason for selecting the donee: Grant investigation and main influencer is excited about the projects Tyre is interested in working on, and writes: "Eli has worked on a large variety of interesting and valuable projects over the last few years, many of them too small to have much payment infrastructure, resulting in him doing a lot of work without appropriate compensation. I think his work has been a prime example of picking low-hanging fruit by using local information and solving problems that aren’t worth solving at scale, and I want him to have resources to continue working in this space."

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): Likely to be the amount requested by the donee in the application (this is not stated explicitly by either the donor or the donee)
Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 3.25%

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determined by timing of grant round

Other notes: The grant reasoning is written up by Oliver Habryka and is available at https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/CJJDwgyqT4gXktq6g/long-term-future-fund-april-2019-grant-decision.
Center for Applied Rationality174,021.0012018-08-14Rationality improvementhttps://app.effectivealtruism.org/funds/far-future/payouts/6g4f7iae5Ok6K6YOaAiyK0Nick Beckstead Grant made from the Long-Term Future Fund. Beckstead recommended that the grantee spend the money to save time and increase productivity of employees (for instance, by subsidizing childcare or electronics). Percentage of total donor spend in the corresponding batch of donations: 100.00%.

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