Google.org donations made (filtered to cause areas matching Crisis response)

This is an online portal with information on donations that were announced publicly (or have been shared with permission) that were of interest to Vipul Naik. The git repository with the code for this portal, as well as all the underlying data, is available on GitHub. All payment amounts are in current United States dollars (USD). The repository of donations is being seeded with an initial collation by Issa Rice as well as continued contributions from him (see his commits and the contract work page listing all financially compensated contributions to the site) but all responsibility for errors and inaccuracies belongs to Vipul Naik. Current data is preliminary and has not been completely vetted and normalized; if sharing a link to this site or any page on this site, please include the caveat that the data is preliminary (if you want to share without including caveats, please check with Vipul Naik). We expect to have completed the first round of development by the end of March 2022. See the about page for more details. Also of interest: pageview data on analytics.vipulnaik.com, tutorial in README, request for feedback to EA Forum.

Table of contents

Basic donor information

ItemValue
Country United States
Wikipedia pagehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google.org
Best overview URLhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google.org
Websitehttps://www.google.org/
Donations URLhttps://www.google.org/our-work/
Twitter usernameGoogleorg
Regularity with which donor updates donations datacontinuous updates
Regularity with which Donations List Website updates donations data (after donor update)irregular
Lag with which donor updates donations datamonths
Lag with which Donations List Website updates donations data (after donor update)years
Data entry method on Donations List WebsiteManual (no scripts used)

Brief history: Founded in October 2005 as the charity arm of tech giant Google

Brief notes on broad donor philosophy and major focus areas: Stated focus areas of education, economic opportunity, inclusion, and crisis response. See https://www.google.org/our-work/ for more details

Notes on grant publication logistics: Most grants do not have individual grant pages, but the biggest ones do. Google.org has a JS-heavy site where they list their donations. We did not find a way to programmatically process the donations. We manually entered all their donations at some point in time, but are not incrementally updating in a scalable way right now

Donor donation statistics

Cause areaCountMedianMeanMinimum10th percentile 20th percentile 30th percentile 40th percentile 50th percentile 60th percentile 70th percentile 80th percentile 90th percentile Maximum
Overall 5 2,500,000 2,900,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 5,700,000 5,700,000
Global health 2 1,000,000 1,750,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000
Crisis response 2 2,000,000 3,850,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 5,700,000 5,700,000 5,700,000 5,700,000 5,700,000
Education 1 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000

Donation amounts by cause area and year

If you hover over a cell for a given cause area and year, you will get a tooltip with the number of donees and the number of donations.

Note: Cause area classification used here may not match that used by donor for all cases.

Cause area Number of donations Number of donees Total 2016 2015 2014
Crisis response (filter this donor) 2 2 7,700,000.00 0.00 7,700,000.00 0.00
Global health (filter this donor) 2 2 3,500,000.00 1,000,000.00 0.00 2,500,000.00
Education (filter this donor) 1 1 3,300,000.00 3,300,000.00 0.00 0.00
Total 5 5 14,500,000.00 4,300,000.00 7,700,000.00 2,500,000.00

Graph of spending by cause area and year (incremental, not cumulative)

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Graph of spending by cause area and year (cumulative)

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Donation amounts by subcause area and year

If you hover over a cell for a given subcause area and year, you will get a tooltip with the number of donees and the number of donations.

For the meaning of “classified” and “unclassified”, see the page clarifying this.

Subcause area Number of donations Number of donees Total 2016 2015 2014
Crisis response/Refugee support/Internet access 1 1 5,700,000.00 0.00 5,700,000.00 0.00
Education/crisis response/refugee education 1 1 3,300,000.00 3,300,000.00 0.00 0.00
Global health/crisis response/Ebola 1 1 2,500,000.00 0.00 0.00 2,500,000.00
Crisis response/Refugee information 1 1 2,000,000.00 0.00 2,000,000.00 0.00
Global health/Crisis response/Zika 1 1 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 0.00 0.00
Classified total 5 5 14,500,000.00 4,300,000.00 7,700,000.00 2,500,000.00
Unclassified total 0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 5 5 14,500,000.00 4,300,000.00 7,700,000.00 2,500,000.00

Graph of spending by subcause area and year (incremental, not cumulative)

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Graph of spending by subcause area and year (cumulative)

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Donation amounts by donee and year

Donee Cause area Metadata Total 2016 2015 2014
NetHope (filter this donor) Tw WP Site 5,700,000.00 0.00 5,700,000.00 0.00
Libraries without Borders (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 3,300,000.00 3,300,000.00 0.00 0.00
Médecins Sans Frontières (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 2,500,000.00 0.00 0.00 2,500,000.00
International Rescue Committee (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 2,000,000.00 0.00 2,000,000.00 0.00
UNICEF (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 0.00 0.00
Total -- -- 14,500,000.00 4,300,000.00 7,700,000.00 2,500,000.00

Graph of spending by donee and year (incremental, not cumulative)

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Graph of spending by donee and year (cumulative)

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Donation amounts by influencer and year

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Donation amounts by disclosures and year

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Donation amounts by country and year

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Full list of donations in reverse chronological order (5 donations)

Graph of top 10 donees by amount, showing the timeframe of donations

Graph of donations and their timeframes
DoneeAmount (current USD)Amount rank (out of 5)Donation dateCause areaURLInfluencerNotes
UNICEF1,000,000.0052016Global health/Crisis response/Zikahttps://www.google.org/our-work/crisis-response/unicef-zika/-- Google.org made a $1 million grant to support UNICEF’s efforts to create widespread awareness, reduce mosquito populations, and support the development of diagnostics and vaccines, and launched an employee donation campaign to support UNICEF and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). To bolster UNICEF’s existing prevention tactics Google.org’s Disaster Corps program dispatched a team of volunteer Google engineers, designers and data scientists to help build a platform that analyzes data such as weather or travel patterns in order to predict where the virus might hit next. Although the prototype is currently being applied to Zika, UNICEF intends to use it to study and fight future outbreaks of other diseases.
Libraries without Borders3,300,000.0022016Education/crisis response/refugee educationhttps://www.google.org/our-work/crisis-response/libraries-without-borders/-- Initial grant to expand Ideas Boxes to more countries, enabling access to content in refugee settings, rural areas, and underserved neighborhoods. Through Google.org funding, Libraries Without Borders has been able to deploy five Ideas Boxes for refugees in Greece (Lesvos, Athens, Malkasa), France (Grande-Synthe) and Germany (Düsseldorf). In 2017, Google.org will provide additional grant funding to support Libraries Without Borders with the installation of 6 Ideas Boxes in Europe and 8 Ideas Boxes in the African Great Lakes’ region.
NetHope5,700,000.0012015Crisis response/Refugee support/Internet accesshttps://www.google.org/our-work/crisis-response/nethope/-- $900,000 grant to NetHope addressed connectivity issues frequently experienced by refugees. NetHope installed low-cost WiFi and charging stations along migration routes in the Balkan Region. Under Google.org’s Disaster Corps program, Google volunteers joined Cisco volunteers to help NetHope install 75 hotspots within refugee camps and transit centers, giving over 500,000 inhabitants access to the internet. Similarly, a second grant of $5.3 million allowed NetHope to purchase and distribute 25,000 Chromebooks to nonprofits working with refugees in Germany. The devices let the organizations distribute informational content and tailor programming to fit specific user needs like children’s education or job opportunities.
International Rescue Committee2,000,000.0042015Crisis response/Refugee informationhttps://www.google.org/our-work/crisis-response/irc-refugee-crisis/-- Google volunteers worked with the International Rescue Committee and Mercy Corps to launch a “Crisis Info Hub” for refugees. The hub provided critical information about safe movement, legal rights, and trustworthy services in Greece and the Balkans. Now called Refugee.Info, the platform aggregates and publishes location-based information about rights and services available to refugees and asylum seekers. Refugee.Info is live in Greece and Serbia and will soon expand to more countries in the Balkans, the Central Mediterranean, and the Middle East.
Médecins Sans Frontières2,500,000.0032014Global health/crisis response/Ebolahttps://www.google.org/our-work/crisis-response/msf-ebola/-- Supported through funding from Google.org, MSF mobilized thousands of staff to support immediate relief efforts, trained nearly 600 first responders and thousands of West African health staff in patient care, safety precautions, and safe burials. At the height of the outbreak, MSF operated 650 beds in isolation and had 4,475 staff on the ground providing care to 10,200+ people. Upon seeing how difficult it was to track patients’ medical information during the Ebola outbreak, Google engineers also contributed to the development of products that could help doctors better manage and organize patient records while working in the field. The first of these efforts was dubbed Project Buendia - an open source medical system app with a simple UI that could be navigated by doctors in full protective gear to eliminate the need for paper records. Later, Google engineers also developed a prototype for a waterproof, sterilizable tablet that was covered in polycarbonate and can be dipped in chlorine disinfectant.

Similarity to other donors

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