Luke Muehlhauser money moved

This is an online portal with information on donations that were announced publicly (or have been shared with permission) that were of interest to Vipul Naik. The git repository with the code for this portal, as well as all the underlying data, is available on GitHub. All payment amounts are in current United States dollars (USD). The repository of donations is being seeded with an initial collation by Issa Rice as well as continued contributions from him (see his commits and the contract work page listing all financially compensated contributions to the site) but all responsibility for errors and inaccuracies belongs to Vipul Naik. Current data is preliminary and has not been completely vetted and normalized; if sharing a link to this site or any page on this site, please include the caveat that the data is preliminary (if you want to share without including caveats, please check with Vipul Naik). We expect to have completed the first round of development by the end of March 2022. See the about page for more details. Also of interest: pageview data on analytics.vipulnaik.com, tutorial in README, request for feedback to EA Forum.

Table of contents

Full list of documents in reverse chronological order (4 documents)

Title (URL linked)Publication dateAuthorPublisherAffected donorsAffected doneesDocument scopeNotes
Hi, I’m Luke Muehlhauser. AMA about Open Philanthropy’s new report on consciousness and moral patienthood2017-06-28Luke Muehlhauser Effective Altruism ForumOpen Philanthropy Dyrevernalliansen Albert Schweitzer Foundation for Our Contemporaries Eurogroup for Animals Reasoning supplementLuke Muehlhauser hosts an Ask Me Anything (AMA) on the Effective Altruism Forum about his recently published report https://www.openphilanthropy.org/2017-report-consciousness-and-moral-patienthood (2017-06-06). The post gets 61 comments.
2017 Report on Consciousness and Moral Patienthood2017-06-06Luke Muehlhauser Open PhilanthropyOpen Philanthropy Dyrevernalliansen Albert Schweitzer Foundation for Our Contemporaries Eurogroup for Animals Reasoning supplementThe writeup announced at https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/new-report-consciousness-and-moral-patienthood provides an overview of the findings of Luke Muehlhauser on moral patienthood -- a broad subject covering what creatures are the subject of moral concern. As described at https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/radical-empathy Open Phil identifies with radical empathy, extending concern to beings considered of moral concern, even if they are not traditionally subjects of empathy and concern. See https://www.facebook.com/groups/effective.altruists/permalink/1426329927423360/ for a discussion of the post on the Effective Altruism Facebook group, and see http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1c3/hi_im_luke_muehlhauser_ama_about_open/ for a related AMA. The writeup influenced the Open Philanthropy Project Farm Animal Welfare Officer Lewis Bollard to investigate and donate in the domain of fish welfare; see http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1c3/hi_im_luke_muehlhauser_ama_about_open/b8o for a comment clarifying this effect.
A conversation with Lewis Bollard, February 23, 20172017-02-23Lewis Bollard Luke Muehlhauser Open PhilanthropyOpen Philanthropy Review of current state of cause areaFarm animal welfare program officer Lewis Bollard speaks with Luke Muehlhauser, investigator into moral patienthood, on the history of the animal rights and welfare movements as well as recent developments.
Brian Tomasik, Research Lead, Foundational Research Institute on October 6, 20162016-10-06Brian Tomasik Luke Muehlhauser Open PhilanthropyOpen Philanthropy Reasoning supplementConversation as part of research by Muehlhauser into moral patienthood, that would culminate in the writeup https://www.openphilanthropy.org/2017-report-consciousness-and-moral-patienthood published in 2017.

Full list of donations in reverse chronological order (8 donations)

DonorDoneeAmount (current USD)Donation dateCause areaURLNotes
Open PhilanthropyGood Judgment Inc.40,000.002020-03Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness/COVID-19https://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/global-catastrophic-risks/biosecurity/good-judgment-inc-covid-19-forecasting Intended use of funds (category): Direct project expenses

Intended use of funds: Grant to expand "efforts to aggregate, publish, and track forecasts about the COVID-19 outbreak with the hope that the forecasts can help improve planning by health security professionals and the broader public, limit the spread of the virus, and save lives. The forecasts are aggregated each day from the most accurate 1-2% of forecasters from a large-scale, government-funded series of forecasting tournaments, plus an annual uptake of a handful of top performers from the nearly 40,000 forecasters on Good Judgement Open." The predictions are at https://goodjudgment.io/covid/dashboard/ and the reasoning is explained more in https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/forecasting-covid-19-pandemic

Donor reason for selecting the donee: The grant is made at around the time the COVID-19 pandemic is being acknowledged worldwide, and just as Open Phil is ramping up grantmaking in the area. The grant investigator, Luke Muehlhauser, has generally been interested in forecasting. Most other COVID-19 grants are investigated by Jacob Trefethen.

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): Amount likely determined by project cost

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Timing determmined by the breaking out of the COVID-19 pandemic
Intended funding timeframe in months: 1

Donor thoughts on making further donations to the donee: The blog post https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/forecasting-covid-19-pandemic says: "We may commission additional forecasts related to COVID-19 in the coming months, and we welcome suggestions of well-formed questions for which regularly updated forecasts would be especially helpful to public health professionals and the broader public." Announced: 2020-03-17.
Open PhilanthropyWestExec310,000.002020-02AI safetyhttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/global-catastrophic-risks/potential-risks-advanced-artificial-intelligence/westexec-report-on-assurance-in-machine-learning-systems Intended use of funds (category): Direct project expenses

Intended use of funds: Contractor agreement "to support the production and distribution of a report on advancing policy, process, and funding for the Department of Defense’s work on test, evaluation, verification, and validation for deep learning systems." Announced: 2020-03-20.
Open PhilanthropyRAND Corporation30,751.002020-01AI safetyhttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/global-catastrophic-risks/potential-risks-advanced-artificial-intelligence/rand-corporation-research-on-the-state-of-ai-assurance-methods Intended use of funds (category): Direct project expenses

Intended use of funds: Grant "to support exploratory research by Andrew Lohn on the state of AI assurance methods." Announced: 2020-03-19.
Open PhilanthropyCenter for Security and Emerging Technology55,000,000.002019-01Security/Biosecurity and pandemic preparedness/Global catastrophic risks/AI safetyhttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/georgetown-university-center-security-and-emerging-technology Intended use of funds (category): Organizational general support

Intended use of funds: Grant via Georgetown University for the Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), a new think tank led by Jason Matheny, formerly of IARPA, dedicated to policy analysis at the intersection of national and international security and emerging technologies. CSET plans to provide nonpartisan technical analysis and advice related to emerging technologies and their security implications to the government, key media outlets, and other stakeholders.

Donor reason for selecting the donee: Open Phil thinks that one of the key factors in whether AI is broadly beneficial for society is whether policymakers are well-informed and well-advised about the nature of AI’s potential benefits, potential risks, and how these relate to potential policy actions. As AI grows more powerful, calls for government to play a more active role are likely to increase, and government funding and regulation could affect the benefits and risks of AI. Thus: "Overall, we feel that ensuring high-quality and well-informed advice to policymakers over the long run is one of the most promising ways to increase the benefits and reduce the risks from advanced AI, and that the team put together by CSET is uniquely well-positioned to provide such advice." Despite risks and uncertainty, the grant is described as worthwhile under Open Phil's hits-based giving framework

Donor reason for donating that amount (rather than a bigger or smaller amount): The large amount over an extended period (5 years) is explained at https://www.openphilanthropy.org/blog/questions-we-ask-ourselves-making-grant "In the case of the new Center for Security and Emerging Technology, we think it will take some time to develop expertise on key questions relevant to policymakers and want to give CSET the commitment necessary to recruit key people, so we provided a five-year grant."

Donor reason for donating at this time (rather than earlier or later): Likely determined by the timing that the grantee plans to launch. More timing details are not discussed
Intended funding timeframe in months: 60

Other notes: Donee is entered as Center for Security and Emerging Technology rather than as Georgetown University for consistency with future grants directly to the organization once it is set up. Founding members of CSET include Dewey Murdick from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, William Hannas from the CIA, and Helen Toner from the Open Philanthropy Project. The grant is discussed in the broader context of giving by the Open Philanthropy Project into global catastrophic risks and AI safety in the Inside Philanthropy article https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2019/3/22/why-this-effective-altruist-funder-is-giving-millions-to-ai-security. Announced: 2019-02-28.
Open PhilanthropyThe Wilson Center400,000.002018-07AI safetyhttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/focus/global-catastrophic-risks/potential-risks-advanced-artificial-intelligence/wilson-center-ai-policy-seminar-series Grant over two years to support a series of in-depth AI policy seminars. Named for President Woodrow Wilson, the Wilson Center is a non-partisan policy forum for tackling global issues through independent research and open dialogue. Open Phil believes the seminar series could help raise the salience of AI policy in Washington, D.C. policymaking circles, and could help us identify and empower one or more influential thinkers in those circles, a key component of the Open Phil AI policy strategy. Announced: 2018-08-02.
Open PhilanthropyUrban Institute165,833.002017-12History of philanthropyhttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/research/history-of-philanthropy/urban-institute-history-of-philanthropy-project Grant to support a series of literature reviews and case studies on the history of philanthropy. The work will be led primarily by Benjamin Soskis, a research associate at the Urban Institute, who has previously produced case studies for our history of philanthropy project. Announced: 2018-02-22.
Open PhilanthropyUniversity of Pennsylvania1,550,000.002017-07Forecastinghttps://www.openphilanthropy.org/giving/grants/university-pennsylvania-philip-tetlock-making-conversations-smarter-faster Grant to support development and pre-testing of the “Making Conversations Smarter, Faster” project. The work is led by Professors Philip Tetlock and Barbara Mellers of University of Pennsylvania, and Professor Emeritus Daniel Kahneman of Princeton University. The original grant amount was $1.3 million, and $250,000 was added in February 2019. Announced: 2017-08-25.
Brian TomasikMachine Intelligence Research Institute2,000.002015AI safety-- Thank you for a helpful conversation with outgoing director Luke Muehlhauser; information conveyed via private communication and published with permission.

Donation amounts by donee and year

Donee Donors influenced Cause area Metadata Total 2020 2019 2018 2017 2015
Center for Security and Emerging Technology Open Philanthropy (filter this donor) 55,000,000.00 0.00 55,000,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
University of Pennsylvania Open Philanthropy (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 1,550,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,550,000.00 0.00
The Wilson Center Open Philanthropy (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 400,000.00 0.00 0.00 400,000.00 0.00 0.00
WestExec Open Philanthropy (filter this donor) 310,000.00 310,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Urban Institute Open Philanthropy (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 165,833.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 165,833.00 0.00
Good Judgment Inc. Open Philanthropy (filter this donor) 40,000.00 40,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
RAND Corporation Open Philanthropy (filter this donor) FB Tw WP Site 30,751.00 30,751.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Machine Intelligence Research Institute Brian Tomasik (filter this donor) AI safety FB Tw WP Site CN GS TW 2,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,000.00
Total ---- -- 57,498,584.00 380,751.00 55,000,000.00 400,000.00 1,715,833.00 2,000.00

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Donation amounts by donor and year for influencer Luke Muehlhauser

Donor Donees Total 2020 2019 2018 2017 2015
Open Philanthropy (filter this donee) Center for Security and Emerging Technology (filter this donee), Good Judgment Inc. (filter this donee), RAND Corporation (filter this donee), The Wilson Center (filter this donee), University of Pennsylvania (filter this donee), Urban Institute (filter this donee), WestExec (filter this donee) 57,496,584.00 380,751.00 55,000,000.00 400,000.00 1,715,833.00 0.00
Brian Tomasik (filter this donee) Machine Intelligence Research Institute (filter this donee) 2,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,000.00
Total -- 57,498,584.00 380,751.00 55,000,000.00 400,000.00 1,715,833.00 2,000.00

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